Should drivers have to retake their driving test?

We looked into what age people in the UK think you should have to do your driving test again.

Passing your driving test is usually met with a sigh of relief, knowing all those lessons and hours spent learning were worth it in the end. However, with the laws of the roads often drastically changing, should drivers be made to retake their tests when they reach a certain age? We’ve looked into what Brits think about retaking your driving test and how age affects car insurance prices.

Quick overview

  • Three-quarters (74%) of Brits believe you have to retake your driving test in your lifetime.
  • 68 years old is the average age people in the UK think individuals should have to retake their driving test.
  • Over three-quarters (77%) of over 70s in the UK hold a driving licence.
  • Only one-fifth (18%) of Brits do not think you should have to retake your driving test.
  • 1 in 5 drivers (22%) are involved in a car accident within their first year of driving.
  • In the UK, there were 110,790 people aged 90 and over who held driving licences.
  • In 2019, there were 157,787 accidents involving car drivers.

What age should drivers retake their test?

Our survey found that the average age people felt individuals should retake their driving test was 68 years old.
Overall, 17% of respondents felt that those aged between 71 and 75 should have to redo their test. However, almost one-fifth (18%) felt that individuals should not be required to retake their driving test.

A tenth (10%) of Brits think the age should be below 55 years old.

Age Percentage
Under 50 2.70%
50-55 7.30%
56-60 5.95%
61-65 10.49%
66-70 13.84%
71-75 17.14%
76-80 8.80%
81-85 5.30%
86-90 1.35%
91-95 0.65%
96-100 0.25%
101+ 0.40%
Unsure 7.55%
Never 18.29%

Gender differences: What age should people retake their driving test?

In our recent survey, on average, women said those aged 69 years old should retake their test. Whereas male participants said the age should be slightly lower, at 67 years old.

Gender Age they think people should retake their test
Male 67 years old
Female 69 years old

Generational differences: What age should people retake their driving test?

There is a clear trend when looking at generational responses. The older the respondent, the older the age they felt individuals should retake their test. When asked what age individuals should redo their driving test, the silent generation (74 years and above) responded with 76 years old. Baby boomers (55-73 years old) said 71 years old, generation X (43-53 years old) replied with 68 years old and millennials (24-42 years old) replied with 66 years old. However, those in generation Z (18-24 years old) responded with the youngest age, 65 years old.

Generation Age they think people should retake their test
Gen z 65 years old
Millennials 66 years old
Gen X 68 years old
Baby Boomers 71 years old
Silent Gen 76 years old

Regional differences: What age should people retake their driving test?

Our survey also revealed some regional differences. When asked what age people should retake their driving test, Scotland and Wales responded with the oldest age of 70. Whereas London and the West Midlands responded with the youngest age of 66.

Region Age they think people should retake their test
East Midlands 68 years old
East of England 69 years old
London 66 years old
West Midlands 66 years old
North East England 69 years old
North West England 67 years old
Northern Ireland 67 years old
Scotland 70 years old
South East England 68 years old
South West England and Gibraltar 69 years old
Wales 70 years old
Yorkshire and the Humber 68 years old

Road accidents

Despite many respondents feeling that older drivers need to retake their test, older drivers are less likely to be involved in road accidents compared to those who have just recently passed their test. Data shows that those between the ages of 60 and 69 are involved in less than half the number of car accidents compared to 20- to 29-year-olds. New drivers seem to be at the greatest risk of accidents. In the first year of passing their test, 1 in 5 new drivers are involved in car accidents.

Car insurance prices

As older drivers are statistically less likely to be involved in accidents, there is a stark age-related difference in car insurance prices. Newly qualified drivers aged 20 pay £851 for their car insurance on average. This is 81% more than those aged 55 years old (£468), who are quoted the cheapest car insurance price. 25-year-olds pay the third highest for car insurance (£719), followed chronologically by 35-year-olds (£639) and 45-year-olds (£575).

Individuals aged 75, pay the second highest car insurance price at £752, which is an increase of 53% compared to those just 10 years younger (£491).

Driver Age Average Cost of Cheap Comprehensive Car Insurance
20 Years £851
25 Years £719
35 Years £639
45 Years £575
55 Years £468
65 Years £491
75 Years £752

For all media enquiries, please contact

Matt Mckenna
UK Communications Manager
T: +44 20 8191 8806
matt.mckenna@finder.com@MichHutchison/in/matthewmckenna2

Methodology

  • Finder commissioned Censuswide on 8-11 July 2022 to carry out a nationally representative survey of adults aged 18+.
  • A total of 2,000 people were questioned throughout Great Britain, with representative quotas for gender, age and region.

Sources

  • ALA
  • NimbleFins
  • ABI

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