Compare cheap car insurance

Are you overpaying for car insurance? Discover your options and how to keep costs down, and compare more than 100 car insurance deals.

Most people who switch save hundreds. Use the filters to select features like a courtesy car or to view just comprehensive policies or other policy types. To see 2 or 3 policies side-by-side in detail, tick "Compare" on the left-hand side. When you're ready to get a quote, hit the green button.

Name Product Ratings Courtesy car Windscreen repair Accident cover Multi-car discount EU Cover Link
LV= Comprehensive
Finder score
★★★★★
★★★★★
User survey
★★★★★
★★★★★
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Finder's summary: LV='s comprehensive car insurance is a strong competitor in the market. The company is well respected and did well for customer service in our survey. A downside is that some changes to your policy can result in admin charges and cancellation past the 14-day cooling-off period means paying a cancellation fee.
Admiral Comprehensive
Finder score
★★★★★
★★★★★
User survey
★★★★★
★★★★★
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Finder's summary: Admiral has a range of products on offer to cater for a variety of needs, including black box, classic car and learner driver policies. The company’s comprehensive policy offers a good level of cover, with benefits including courtesy car and windscreen repair. Customers love the company’s policy, which is evident in the awards Admiral has received.

Who it might be good for: Someone who wants a well rounded comprehensive policy that caters to a range of needs.
AA Comprehensive
Finder score
★★★★★
★★★★★
User survey
★★★★★
★★★★★
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Finder's summary: Car insurance from The AA is particularly attractive to existing AA members. However, the comprehensive policy scored highly in our overall policy rating and customers said the service is helpful and efficient.

Who it might be good for: Someone who is looking for a top rated comprehensive policy and values a high level of customer satisfaction.
Churchill Comprehensive
Finder score
★★★★★
★★★★★
User survey
★★★★★
★★★★★
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Finder's summary: The company’s comprehensive cover is a good option if you’re looking for full protection for your car. Even if you don’t need that level of cover, it’s worth getting a quote for both cover options, as comprehensive can sometimes work out cheaper than just third party, fire and theft.

Who it might be good for: Churchill’s policies are not the cheapest, but you get what you pay for so always consider your needs above the price tag.
Hastings Direct Standard
Finder score
★★★★★
★★★★★
User survey
★★★★★
★★★★★
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Finder's summary: Hastings Direct does offer strong options for comprehensive car cover, as well as other types of car insurance, such as multi-car and black box cover. However, its website could be a lot more user-friendly to make it easier for customers to understand what is and isn’t included in their policy.

Who it might be good for: Someone who wants an all-round comprehensive policy, that can also have multi-car or a black box policy.
Age Co Comprehensive
Finder score
★★★★★
★★★★★
User survey
★★★★★
★★★★★
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Finder's summary: Unlike most insurers, Age Co doesn’t have an upper age limit and its comprehensive policy includes a lot of helpful benefits, such as a courtesy car and the Get You Home service (which ensures you arrive home or to your destination if your car isn’t roadworthy after an accident).

Who it might be good for: Age Co policies are designed specifically with those aged over 50 in mind.
By Miles car insurance
Finder score
★★★★★
★★★★★
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Finder's summary: By Miles is a car insurer that’s challenging the traditional model – it offers pay-as-you-go (PAYG) insurance, so instead of a flat rate, you pay based on how much you drive.

Who it might be good for: Someone who is looking for a comprehensive policy that you can pay for by the mile.
AA Third party, fire and theft
Finder score
★★★★★
★★★★★
User survey
★★★★★
★★★★★
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Finder's summary: There are 4 levels of cover. The AA doesn’t offer third party (the legal minimum) on its own, but it does offer third party, fire and theft (TPFT) and 3 comprehensive policies. If you’re a young driver with a car that is not worth a whole heap of money, you may be better off going for third party, fire and theft insurance.

Who it might be good for: Someone who needs the basics covered.
Churchill Third Party Fire and Theft
Finder score
★★★★★
★★★★★
User survey
★★★★★
★★★★★
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Finder's summary: In our 2024 customer satisfaction awards, Churchill got 3.3 out of 5 stars, with 79% of customers saying they would recommend the service. Churchill’s policies are not the cheapest, but you get what you pay for so always consider your needs above the price tag.

Who it might be good for: Someone looking for a policy that has the option to easily upgrade to a higher level of cover.
Aviva Comprehensive
Finder score
★★★★★
★★★★★
User survey
★★★★★
★★★★★
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Finder's summary: Aviva is the biggest insurance provider in the UK and, while size isn’t everything, its policies deliver. It also gained 4.3 out of 5 stars in our 2024 Finder Customer Satisfaction Awards for car insurance. That said, you get what you pay for, so Aviva’s policies are not the cheapest on the market.

Who it might be good for: Someone who wants an all-round comprehensive policy.
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What is car insurance?

Car insurance offers financial protection if your car is damaged, stolen or involved in an accident. You pay an upfront premium and, in exchange, your insurer will cover the majority of costs to put unexpected problems right.

In the UK, you can’t legally drive without having at least third-party car insurance. This pays out if you damage someone else’s car or injure someone in an accident that was your fault, but it won’t cover damage to or theft of your own car. There are 2 higher levels of cover: third-party, fire and theft and comprehensive. We’ve set out in detail what you get and don’t get with each type of cover below.

Contrary to what you might expect, comprehensive cover can be the cheapest of the 3. That’s because, historically, higher-risk drivers have tended to opt for third-party cover to try and keep costs down. Ironically, this has pushed up the cost of this type of cover. So, even if you’re looking to keep costs to a minimum, it’s worth comparing quotes for all 3 types. You might be pleasantly surprised.

Car insurance jargon explained

Certificate of motor insurance. A document you get from your insurer that provides legal evidence that you’re insured.
Duty of disclosure. You have to answer the insurer’s questions truthfully. Otherwise, it can refuse to pay out if you claim. If there’s a change in the details you gave the insurer – you move home or change job, for example – you have to inform it about that.
Insurance policy document. Your insurer will send you this. It contains the nitty-gritty of what your policy will and won’t cover.
No-claims bonus. Also known as a no-claims discount. For every year you drive without making a claim, an insurer will typically give you a discount on the following year’s premium.

How to compare car insurance

  1. Shop around every year. In the past, many customers were hit with a “loyalty penalty” for just letting their policy renew with the same provider. New Financial Conduct Authority rules mean that insurers can no longer charge existing customers more than new ones. However, that doesn’t mean that the provider that was cheapest last year will still be the cheapest come renewal. Switching is likely to get you big savings. And always check your existing policy has the right level of cover before you start comparing.
  2. Check price comparison sites and direct-only providers. Different comparison sites may include a slightly different list of insurers, and the deals they have may also vary, so it’s worth checking at least a couple. And some insurers, such as Direct Line, aren’t on comparison sites at all. If you have unusual needs, such as owning a classic car, it may also be worth contacting specialist brokers.
  3. Get your details right. The cost of cover is influenced by your age, location, occupation and marital status, among other factors. Changing one minor detail when completing your application form can have a big impact on the quotes you receive. Make sure all your personal details and information are correct to ensure you’re getting accurate quotes. If your job can legitimately be described in different ways, it’s worth checking all variations.
  4. Compare the benefits as well as the price. Policies have subtle differences. When you get your quotes through, it’s worth looking at the details to make sure you’re not sacrificing crucial cover for the sake of a few pounds. You can get cheap car insurance that has good benefits.

How can I save money on my car insurance?

  1. Increase security. If your car doesn’t have an alarm, consider adding one to reduce your premium.
  2. Park in a secure place. Cars kept in a garage or on a secure driveway are usually cheaper to insure.
  3. Cut the mileage. If you’re working from home more often or you’ve started using a bicycle more, tell your insurer about your reduced mileage.
  4. Up the excess. Increasing your voluntary excess can reduce your premium. You just need to be sure you can pay the increased amount if you have to claim.
  5. Pay annually, if you can. There can be a big difference in your premium if you opt to pay for the whole year upfront instead of paying monthly instalments.
  6. Consider a telematics policy. Having a “black box” fitted to your car to track your driving could result in discounts for careful drivers.
  7. Add an experienced named driver. If you’re young or new to driving, adding a more experienced and lower-risk driver to your policy as a named driver could reduce your premiums.

Red car with stat:Gen Z would wait until damage costs over £1,000 to claim on car insurance

What types of car insurance are there?

There are 3 main types of car insurance: third-party (the lowest level of cover); third-party, fire and theft; and comprehensive (the highest level). Click on the tabs below to find out what is and isn’t covered with each type.

This is the most complete form of insurance you can get. Benefits vary by insurer, but comprehensive car insurance typically covers most types of loss or damage.

What is covered?

  • Damage to property, your vehicle or other vehicles following an accident.
  • Injuries involving your car to yourself and others, both in your car and other vehicles.
  • Replacing your car if it’s stolen.
  • Damage to your car as a result of fire or attempted theft.
  • Other damage to your car.

What isn’t covered?

Comprehensive car insurance.

In addition to providing the benefits of third-party cover, this protects your car against fire and theft. It’s a popular choice for those who find comprehensive comes in too expensive.

What is covered?

  • Injuries involving your car to other people, both in your car and other vehicles.
  • Damage caused by your car to other people’s property or vehicles.
  • Replacing your car if it’s stolen.
  • Damage to your car as a result of fire or attempted theft.

What isn’t covered?

  • Other damage to your car, including damage from an accident.
  • Cover if you get injured.
  • A payout if your car is written off.
  • Any optional extras that you haven’t included.
  • Standard exclusions of all mainstream car insurance policies.

Third-party, fire and theft car insurance.

This is the minimum level of cover that all UK drivers are required to have by law. It isn’t always the cheapest and doesn’t protect your own car against any type of damage.

What is covered?

  • Injuries involving your car to other people, both in your car and other vehicles.
  • Damage caused by your car to other people’s property or vehicles.

What isn’t covered?

  • Damage to or destruction of your car, through accident, fire or any other cause.
  • Cover if you get injured.
  • Theft of your car.
  • Any optional extras that you haven’t included.
  • Standard exclusions of all mainstream car insurance policies.

Third-party only car insurance

Car insurance prices are going up after a rise in repair and labour costs, so you are likely to pay more when you renew a policy than last year. But that doesn’t mean you should accept the first quote you’re given or even that you should stick with your current insurer. If you can find a cheaper deal elsewhere, you’re free to move – or you could always ask your insurer to lower its price. If it doesn’t, you could also ask it to throw in something else as a perk, such as breakdown cover or window and glass protection.”

Rebecca Goodman, financial journalist

What are my car insurance options?

Beyond deciding on the level of car insurance cover you want, there are a few extra things to think about.

How long do you need cover for?

  • Continuously, for a car you own and drive regularly. It’s probably best to opt for a standard, annual policy in your own name.
  • Continuously, for a car you drive regularly that belongs to a friend or family member. A standard, annual policy in your name is still an option. You could also consider asking the car’s owner to add you to their policy as a named driver. This might work out cheaper.
  • For a few days or to borrow a car occasionally. In this case, it’s worth checking out if temporary car insurance would suit you best. This costs more per day but may work out cheaper if you’re only borrowing a car to drive every now and then.

Do you need specialist cover?

If your personal circumstances or the car you drive mean your risk profile is out of the norm, it’s worth investigating alternatives to standard car insurance policies. For example, young drivers may get a cheaper premium if they’re willing to have a “black box” fitted to their car, which tracks their driving habits and allows an insurer to reward safe driving.

Meanwhile, those with unusual cars – such as classics, high-performance cars or imported cars – might want to consider using an insurance broker that specialises in these types of vehicles rather than relying on price comparison sites.

And be aware that standard car insurance usually only covers you for commuting to and from a regular place of work. If you use your car for work purposes other than commuting, you’ll need business car insurance.

What optional extras do you want?

There’s a long list of extras that you can add to your car insurance policy. With each, you’ll need to weigh up the value it offers against the cost of adding it on. Some of the most common are:

  • Breakdown cover. If you break down, the provider will send someone out to you to try to fix your car or tow it to a garage.
  • Courtesy car/hire car cover. If your car is being repaired or has been written off after a claim, this cover provides a hire car vehicle until you have your own again.
  • Legal expenses cover. This covers the legal costs of taking someone to court to reclaim costs arising from an accident that insurance hasn’t covered.

Some policies, particularly comprehensive ones, may include one or more of these as standard. So make sure you double-check what’s included when comparing insurance quotes.

Case study: Juliet saved £40 just by calling her insurer

Juliet Harris profile pic
Juliet Harris

Hastings

I've been with Direct Line for nearly a decade, but when I was offered a renewal quote via post, I called them and asked if they were able to improve on that as I was considering leaving. They reduced the quote by around £40. I would say it's always sensible to phone the insurer directly if you are renewing rather than just relying on the automatically issued renewal quote. Also, always check that the information you are providing is up to date, especially the estimated mileage – a lower mileage could also mean a reduced quote.

Is car insurance worth it?

Third-party car insurance is a legal requirement to drive (or even park) on public UK roads, so the question of whether car insurance is worth it is somewhat moot. The real question is whether you should opt for a higher level of cover or not.

Remember that third-party car insurance only covers you for injury to other people and damage to their cars or property. A third-party policy won’t cover you for any damage to or theft of your own car, which could run into thousands or even tens of thousands of pounds.

We reckon your best bet is to keep an open mind and compare all your options before deciding. You may find that you can get comprehensive cover, and the added peace of mind it offers, for not much more – or, in some cases, less – than third-party cover.

Pros and cons of comprehensive car insurance

Pros

  • Covers you for all types of damage to your car.
  • Some comprehensive policies include a range of “optional extras”, such as windscreen or courtesy car cover.
  • May be cheaper than third-party cover in some cases.

Cons

  • May be more expensive than lower levels of cover.
  • With some policies, you’ll still need to pay extra for options such as windscreen or legal expensive cover.
  • There are some exclusions, such as using your car for business purposes.
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Start comparing car insurance

We compare policies from

Age Co car insurance
Elephant car insurance
More Than car insurance
Post Office Money Comprehensive
Churchill
AA Car Insurance
Aviva Comprehensive
Direct Line Comprehensive
LV= Comprehensive
Admiral Comprehensive
Sheilas' Wheels Comprehensive
Hastings Direct Standard
NFU Mutual comprehensive
AXA Comprehensive
Diamond Comprehensive

Frequently asked questions

Purchasing your policy

Choosing the right option

Adjusting your policy

Making a claim

We show offers we can track - that's not every product on the market...yet. Unless we've said otherwise, products are in no particular order. The terms "best", "top", "cheap" (and variations of these) aren't ratings, though we always explain what's great about a product when we highlight it. This is subject to our terms of use. When you make major financial decisions, consider getting independent financial advice. Always consider your own circumstances when you compare products so you get what's right for you. Most of the data in Finder's comparison tables has the source: Moneyfacts Group PLC. In other cases, Finder has sourced data directly from providers.

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