Compare business notice accounts

Learn more about the benefits of opening a business notice savings account.

Opening a business savings account means your business will have money to fall back on in an emergency. You can also earn interest on that money - and with interest rates rising, savings accounts have become a lot more competitive in recent months. Let's look at how business notice accounts work.
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Name Product Interest rate and type Interest paid Invest Term Open via Incentive Table product description Apply link
United Trust Bank – Business 180 Day Notice Base Rate Tracker Account
United Trust Bank – Business 180 Day Notice Base Rate Tracker Account
5.25% AER variable
Yearly
£5,000 - £1,000,000
180 days notice
Open via: website, post
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United Trust Bank – Charity 180 Day Notice Base Rate Tracker Account
United Trust Bank – Charity 180 Day Notice Base Rate Tracker Account
5.25% AER variable
Yearly
£5,000 - £1,000,000
180 days notice
Open via: website, post
The interest rate tracks the Bank of England Base Rate for the duration of the account being open.
Go to site
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Allica Bank – 180-Day Notice Savings Account (Issue 1)
Allica Bank – 180-Day Notice Savings Account (Issue 1)
5.01% AER variable
Anniversary of account opening
£20,000 - £2,000,000
180 days notice
Open via: website
Go to site
View details
United Trust Bank – Charity 200 Day
United Trust Bank – Charity 200 Day
5% AER variable
Yearly
£5,000 - £1,000,000
200 days notice
Open via: website, post
Go to site
View details
United Trust Bank – Business 200 Day Notice Issue 2
United Trust Bank – Business 200 Day Notice Issue 2
5% AER variable
Yearly
£5,000 - £1,000,000
200 days notice
Open via: website, post
Go to site
View details
Market Harborough Building Society – Business 180 Day Notice Account
Market Harborough BS – Business 180 Day Notice Account
5% AER variable
Yearly
£25,000 - £500,000
180 days notice
Open via: branch, post
Go to site
View details
Hinckley & Rugby Building Society – Business 120 - 120 Day Notice Deposit
Hinckley & Rugby BS – Business 120 - 120 Day Notice Deposit
4.6% AER variable
Yearly
£1,000 - £500,000
120 days notice
Open via: branch, post
Go to site
View details
Hinckley & Rugby Building Society – Charity Accumulator - 120 Day Notice
Hinckley & Rugby BS – Charity Accumulator - 120 Day Notice
4.6% AER variable
Yearly
£1,000 - £500,000
120 days notice
Open via: branch, post
Go to site
View details
Virgin Money – 120 Day Charity Notice Account
4.59% AER variable
Monthly
From £1
120 days notice
Open via: branch, post
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View details
Virgin Money – 120 Day Business Notice Account
4.59% AER variable
Monthly
From £1
120 days notice
Open via: branch, post
Go to site
View details
Redwood Bank – 95 Day Business Savings Account (Issue 16)
Redwood Bank – 95 Day Business Savings Account (Issue 16)
4.55% AER variable
Monthly
£10,000 - £1,000,000
95 days notice
Open via: website, post
Go to site
View details
Cambridge & Counties Bank – 95 Day Business Notice Account Issue 24
Cambridge & Counties Bank – 95 Day Business Notice Account Issue 24
4.55% AER variable
Yearly
£10,000 - £3,000,000
95 days notice
Open via: website
Go to site
View details
Redwood Bank – 95 Day Business Savings Account (Issue 16)
Redwood Bank – 95 Day Business Savings Account (Issue 16)
4.55% AER variable
Anniversary of account opening
£10,000 - £1,000,000
95 days notice
Open via: website, post
Go to site
View details
Cambridge & Counties Bank – 95 Day Business Notice Account Issue 24
Cambridge & Counties Bank – 95 Day Business Notice Account Issue 24
4.55% AER variable
Monthly
£10,000 - £3,000,000
95 days notice
Open via: website
Go to site
View details
Oxbury Bank – Farm Business 95 Day Notice (Issue 12)
Oxbury Bank – Farm Business 95 Day Notice (Issue 12)
4.54% AER variable
Monthly
£1,000 - £1,000,000
95 days notice
Open via: website
Go to site
View details
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What is a business notice savings account?

A business notice savings account is a type of business account that requires you to give notice before you can access your money. The amount of notice you need to give can vary dramatically, but generally, the longer the notice period, the better the interest rate you’ll receive.

Overall, notice accounts pay higher rates of interest than savings accounts that let you access your money instantly. However, rates might not be as high as with a fixed-rate bond, where you’re required to lock away your business funds for a set time.

How does a business notice account work?

Business notice savings accounts work similarly to other savings accounts, but they require you to notify the provider ahead of time if you want to make a withdrawal.

How much notice is required varies depending on the account and the provider, but it’s usually anywhere between 30 and 180 days. When comparing notice accounts, you’ll need to consider how far you can plan ahead to work out how much notice you can realistically give before withdrawing funds. In some cases, you might be able to access your money faster, but you’ll usually pay a penalty.

It’s also important to check minimum and maximum deposit requirements to be sure you can meet them. You can usually add to your funds as and when you need to.

Are my savings protected by the FSCS?

As long as your savings account is with a bank or building society authorised by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) or Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA), your savings will be covered by the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS) up to a limit of £85,000.

However, if your savings is with an e-money provider, your funds won’t be protected by the FSCS. Instead, as long as the provider is regulated by the FCA, your money will be held in segregated accounts, so if the provider ceases trading, you should still get your money back.

Are there any other alternatives?

Yes, there are a number of other types of business savings account to consider. If you’d prefer to access your money whenever you need it, a business easy access account would be more suitable. However, interest rates are generally lower than notice accounts.

Alternatively, if you’re prepared to lock away some of your business savings for a period of between 1 and 5 years, you will earn an even higher rate of interest with a business fixed-rate bond. However, you can’t access your money during this time, and you usually can’t add to your savings either.

Bottom line

Business notice accounts can offer a good compromise between an easy access account and a fixed-rate bond. You’ll typically earn a higher rate of interest than an easy access account, but you won’t need to lock away your funds for a lengthy period as you would with a fixed-rate bond.

We show offers we can track - that's not every product on the market...yet. Unless we've said otherwise, products are in no particular order. The terms "best", "top", "cheap" (and variations of these) aren't ratings, though we always explain what's great about a product when we highlight it. This is subject to our terms of use. When you make major financial decisions, consider getting independent financial advice. Always consider your own circumstances when you compare products so you get what's right for you. Most of the data in Finder's comparison tables has the source: Moneyfacts Group PLC. In other cases, Finder has sourced data directly from providers.

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