Finder is committed to editorial independence. While we receive compensation when you click links to partners, they do not influence our opinions or reviews. Learn how we make money.

Compare $100,000 personal loans with competitive rates

Browse your options and learn how much you might have to repay.

Updated . What changed?

Fact checked

Editor's choice: Fiona personal loans

Fiona personal loans logo
  • Compare multiple lenders
  • APR starting at 4.99%
  • Loans up to $100,000
See your rate

Where can I find a $100,000 personal loan?

$100,000 personal loans are typically only available from a handful of online lenders. However, you may be able to find this amount with a select few banks and credit union — although you may need to provide collateral.

Compare lenders that offer $100,000 personal loans

Select your estimated credit score and state, then click Show me my personalized options to view our list of online lenders.

Data indicated here is updated regularly
Name Product Filter Values APR Min. Credit Score Max. Loan Amount
Fiona personal loans
4.99% to 35.99%
Good
$100,000
Get loan offers from multiple lenders at once without affecting your credit score.
Monevo personal loans
3.49% to 35.99%
None
$100,000
Quickly compare multiple online lenders with competitive rates depending on your credit.
Credible Personal Loans
5.95% to 35.99%
Fair to excellent credit
$100,000
Get personalized rates in minutes and then choose a loan offer from several top online lenders.
LightStream
Varies
Good to excellent credit
$100,000
Borrow up to $100,000 with low rates and no fees.
SoFi personal loans
5.99% to 18.72%
680
$100,000
A highly-rated lender with competitive rates, high loan amounts and no fees.
Even Financial personal loans
4.99% to 35.99%
550
$100,000
Get connected to competitive loan offers instantly from top online consumer lenders.
loading

Compare up to 4 providers

What banks and credit unions offer $100,000 personal loans?

These banks and credit unions have personal loan options of $100,000 or higher.

ProductMaximum amountAPRsTermsCollateral required?Learn more
First Republic Bank Eagle Gold Loan$250,000Variable, based on prime rate plus a marginUp to 5 yearsUnsecuredRead review
M&T Bank Cash-Secured Loan$100,0004.24% to 6.49%5 to 10 yearsSecuredRead review
Umpqua Bank secured personal loansNo set maximumStarting at 4.16%Up to 4 yearsSecuredRead review
Wells Fargo unsecured personal loans$100,0005.49% to 24.49%1 to 7 yearsUnsecuredRead review

How to get a $100,000 personal loan

It’s difficult to qualify for such a large amount without first preparing. Follow these steps and double check your information to ensure you put your best foot forward when you submit an application.

  1. Know your credit score. Your credit score will significantly affect your APR and play a key role in the approval process. If you don’t have excellent credit, work on improving it before applying for a loan of $100,000.
  2. Keep your budget in mind. Go over your income and expenses to determine how much you can afford each month. This will help you find the most favorable terms — and avoid breaking the bank.
  3. Compare lenders. Although the selection is limited, take the time to compare lenders and see which ones offer the best APR. Keep a close eye on whether lenders offer secured or unsecured loans, especially if you don’t have the assets to use as collateral.
  4. Apply for preapproval. If it’s available, apply for preapproval to see what rates you might get without affecting your credit. This will let you know if you’ll be able to afford your loan — and help narrow your choice of lenders.
  5. Submit your paperwork. Your lender will want to see proof of income, assets, employment, current debts and residence. When you’re ready to submit a full application, make sure you have everything handy to keep the process quick.
  6. Sign your loan agreement. If approved, review your loan agreement and sign it. Most lenders will be able to fund your loan within one to two business days, although some may take a week or more.

You can also review our guide on how to apply for a personal loan for more details on what lenders look for in a well-rounded borrower.

Am I eligible?

While eligibility requirements vary by lender, you typically need to meet the following criteria to qualify for such a large amount:

  • Excellent credit
  • Steady source of income, usually from employment
  • Ability to afford monthly repayments
  • Low debt-to-income ratio
  • Collateral, if applicable

A bank or credit union may also require you to have a checking or savings account to qualify.

How much does a $100,000 loan cost?

The total cost of your loan will depend on the APR and loan term you’re offered. Because $100,000 loans are limited to borrowers with excellent credit — and may require collateral — you have a better chance of scoring a low APR. This will help keep your total cost down, but you should still expect relatively high monthly repayments because of the large principal.

Some lenders may offer long loan terms, but be wary. This may lower your monthly repayment, but it will mean you pay more in interest over the life of your loan.

You can use the calculator below to see how much you’ll pay by adjusting your APR and loan term.

Let’s take a look at how much you might pay each month and in total based on different APRs and loan terms:

Loan termAPRMonthly paymentTotal interest charges
2 years5%$4,387.14$5,291.34
3 years6%$3,042.19$9,518.97
4 years7%$2,394.62$14,941.97
5 years8%$2,027.64$21,658.37
6 years9%$1,802.55$29,783.87
7 years10%$1,660.12$39,449.95

How can I get a low APR?

$100,000 personal loans typically come with a low APR — largely because you need excellent credit to qualify. But to squeeze the best deal out of your lender, use these three tips:

  • Opt for a secured loan. Secured loans generally have lower APRs than unsecured loans because they pose less risk to the lender. If you can, use a savings account, CD or other assets as collateral when you apply.
  • Include all income and assets. Your lender will want to see that you have the ability to repay $100,000 plus interest. List all income and assets on your application to give yourself the best chance of being approved for a low rate.
  • Add a coapplicant. Not many lenders accept cosigners, but there are a few willing to work with coapplicants — someone who shares joint access and responsibility to the loan. If you include a coapplicant with excellent credit and a high income when you apply, you may receive a rate close to the lender’s minimum.

What to watch out for

While all personal loans come with risk, borrowing $100,000 can put pressure on your finances. So before you sign a loan contract, keep these precautions in mind:

  • Fine print. Your loan agreement will list the fees, interest rate, term and total repayment — along with other costs and limits on how you use your funds. Ask questions if you don’t understand something. You’ll want to know about prepayment options, penalties, the lender’s privacy policy and your rights as a borrower.
  • Additional costs. Consider any fees or charges beyond the interest rate. Origination fees are usually included in the APR, but there pay be additional fees for early repayment or late payments.
  • Long loan terms. It might be tempting to get a loan with a long term to lower your monthly repayments, but you’ll pay more in the long run. Choose the shortest loan term you can afford to limit the amount you pay in interest.

What do I need to know about my credit report and score?

Your credit score is a number that represents your creditworthiness based on five factors: payment history, amounts owed, length of credit history, new credit and types of credit used.

Why is my credit score important?

Your credit score is the first thing most lenders will look at. Especially since you’re applying for a large personal loan, having a good to excellent credit to increase your chances of approval.

Different lenders, credit bureaus and other institutions have various credit rating systems, but a good credit score is typically in the high 600s.

Credit reports vs. credit scores

Your credit report is different from your credit score. Your report is a detailed record of your credit history, including open accounts, credit inquiries and how often you make on-time payments.

You’re entitled to a free credit report from each of the three credit bureaus every year: Experian, Equifax and TransUnion. Lenders may look at the activity on these reports to see if there are any red flags that might not be apparent from your credit score.

Bottom line

For a loan this size, comparing your options is key to getting the lowest rate and best terms you’re eligible for. Even a slight increase in the APR you’re offered could mean a significant jump in the overall cost. But because your options are limited, it pays to learn more about personal loans so you can make the best decision for your finances.

Frequently asked questions

Ask an Expert

You are about to post a question on finder.com:

  • Do not enter personal information (eg. surname, phone number, bank details) as your question will be made public
  • finder.com is a financial comparison and information service, not a bank or product provider
  • We cannot provide you with personal advice or recommendations
  • Your answer might already be waiting – check previous questions below to see if yours has already been asked

Finder.com provides guides and information on a range of products and services. Because our content is not financial advice, we suggest talking with a professional before you make any decision.

By submitting your comment or question, you agree to our Privacy and Cookies Policy and finder.com Terms of Use.

Questions and responses on finder.com are not provided, paid for or otherwise endorsed by any bank or brand. These banks and brands are not responsible for ensuring that comments are answered or accurate.

8 Responses

  1. Default Gravatar
    LaurenSeptember 29, 2018

    Hello,
    I am looking to take out a personal loan of 100k to start my business. My plan is to use part of this money to purchase a home at auction then flip it. The proceeds can pay the loan off with some left over. My credit score is high 700s, I am a landlord for a home in CA which rent covers the mortgage + . My annual income is 100k and 1 credit card. Do you think this is a good avenue to take? Your opinion is appreciated.

    • Avatarfinder Customer Care
      JoshuaOctober 3, 2018Staff

      Hi Lauren,

      Thanks for getting in touch with finder. I hope all is well with you. :)

      As a comparison website, we are not allowed to provide personalized advice. However, there are other things you need to consider when starting your business and if getting a personal loan is a good thing or not. What I can suggest is for you to speak to a financial expert or adviser. You may also do your own research. Gather as much information as possible before making a decision.

      If you are looking for personal loans, please use the table on this page to compare your options. If in case you are looking for a business loan, please go to this page instead.

      I hope this helps. Should you have further questions, please don’t hesitate to reach us out again.

      Have a wonderful day!

      Cheers,
      Joshua

  2. Default Gravatar
    SUGAugust 5, 2018

    I have quite a bit of debit, about $45,000 (that’s all loans & CC’s excluding my mortgage). I want to get a 100,00 loan to pay off all my debit and use the remaining for home improvements. Is that a smart way to go about it or does that affect the banks decision when a loan is being used for multiple things?
    If I can get the loan, my only payments would be my mortgage and the loan.

    • Avatarfinder Customer Care
      JoshuaAugust 12, 2018Staff

      Hi Sug,

      Thanks for getting in touch with finder. I hope all is well with you. :)

      Generally, banks don’t control how you spend your personal loan money. However, there are some types of loans that you specifically agreed with the bank how you will use the money.

      Now, with regards to how it affects your loan, it depends. Banks may also consider how you will spend the money. Nevertheless, there are other more important factors banks consider. For example, they will take a look at your credit score, assess your income, liabilities, and debt, and your general financial situation.

      If you want to learn more how you can increase your eligibility for a personal loan, please visit this page. On this page, you will learn the five main factors lenders consider and what you’ll need to qualify.

      I hope this helps. Should you have further questions, please don’t hesitate to reach us out again.

      Have a wonderful day!

      Cheers,
      Joshua

  3. Default Gravatar
    BasdcoJanuary 11, 2018

    My husband and i need to consolidate our debt, need 100k. Credit scores high 600’s for both. Can my father cosign with us? He is willing and had high credit score in the
    800’s.

    • Default Gravatar
      ArnoldJanuary 12, 2018

      Hi Basdco,

      Thanks for your inquiry.

      You may compare your debt consolidation options and check alternative options which may better suit your needs on this page. Please note that each lender has their own eligibility requirements which you need to meet before you may be considered for a loan.

      Hope this information helps

      Cheers,
      Arnold

  4. Default Gravatar
    GeorgeOctober 5, 2017

    I am looking for a 100,000 personal loan to consolidate my debts. Turned down by sofi because of outstanding student loans for my kids. My only payments would be this loan and my mortgage. Credit score fir myself and spouse both above 730. Any suggestions.

    • Default Gravatar
      AliyyahOctober 5, 2017

      Hi George,

      Thank you for your question. We are a comparison website and general information service, we’re more than happy to offer general advice.

      Since SoFi didn’t approve your loan application and it’s one of the few lenders that offer personal loans for as much as $100,000, your options may be limited. One idea is to look into student loan refinancing so that you can pay down your kids’ student debt faster and have a stronger application for future loans. To improve your chances of being approved in the future, you could also look into increasing your credit score even further or applying with a cosigner.

      Applying with a bank could be another option for larger personal loans.

      Lastly, you can compare maximum loan amounts and eligibility requirements of various lenders to see if any are a better match for you.

      Feel free to reach out to us again should you have any other questions.

      Best regards,

      Aliyyah

Go to site