Stamp duty calculator December 2019

You can quickly calculate your stamp duty bill using our in-depth guide.

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Think carefully before securing other debts against your home. Your home may be repossessed if you do not keep up repayments on your mortgage.

Stamp duty is a tax paid on property purchase and can be confusing for especially for first-time buyers. You are required to pay it if you buy property or land over a certain price in England and Northern Ireland. The tax is slightly different for property and land in Scotland or Wales.

The amount you pay is based on the purchase price. The system is tiered, meaning you’ll pay a different percentage of tax on different portions of the price.

Your stamp duty bill will differ depending on:

  • What country your property is based in.
  • Whether or not you’re a first-time buyer.
  • Whether the property is your main residence or a second home.

Buying a new home in England or Northern Ireland

Stamp duty rates in England and Northern Ireland are exactly the same. It is called stamp duty land tax (SDLT).

  • Portion costing between £0 and £125,000: 0%
  • Portion costing between £125,001 and £250,000: 2%
  • Portion costing between £250,001 and £925,000: 5%
  • Portion costing between £925,001 and £1,500,000: 10%
  • Portion costing over £1,500,000: 12%

So if you’re buying a home for £500,000, you’ll pay:

  • 0% of £125,000 = 0%
  • 2% of £125,000 = £2,500
  • 5% of £250,000 = £12,500

TOTAL: £15,000

First-time buyers in England or Northern Ireland

The government recently removed stamp duty for first-time buyers buying properties worth less than £300,000. Here are the rates.

  • Portion costing between £0 and £300,000: 0%
  • Portion costing between £300,001 and £925,000: 5%
  • Portion costing between £925,001 and £1,500,000: 10%
  • Portion costing over £1,500,000: 12%

So if you’re buying a home for £500,000, you’ll pay:

  • 0% of £300,000 = 0%
  • 5% of £200,000 = £4,000

TOTAL: £4,000

Second homes in England or Northern Ireland

If you’re buying a second home in England or Northern Ireland, you’ll essentially pay a 3% surcharge on each of the stamp duty tiers. Here are the rates.

  • Portion costing between £0 and £125,000: 3%
  • Portion costing between £125,001 and £250,000: 5%
  • Portion costing between £250,001 and £925,000: 8%
  • Portion costing between £925,001 and £1,500,000: 13%
  • Portion costing over £1,500,000: 15%

So if you’re buying a home for £500,000, you’ll pay:

  • 3% of £125,000 = £3,750
  • 5% of £125,000 = £6,250
  • 8% of £250,000 = £20,000

TOTAL: £30,000

Stamp duty in Scotland (LBTT)

Stamp duty in Scotland is called “land and buildings transaction tax” (LBTT).

For home movers

  • Portion costing between £0-£145,000: 0%
  • Portion costing between £145,001 and £250,000: 2%
  • Portion costing between £250,001 and £325,000: 5%
  • Portion costing between £325,001 and £750,000: 10%
  • Portion costing over £750,001: 12%

For first-time buyers

  • Portion costing between £0-£175,000: 0%
  • Portion costing between £175,001 and £250,000: 2%
  • Portion costing between £250,001 and £325,000: 5%
  • Portion costing between £325,001 and £750,000: 10%
  • Portion costing over £750,001: 12%

For second homes

  • Portion costing between £0-£145,000: 3% (although you’ll pay no stamp duty on purchases below £40,000).
  • Portion costing between £145,001 and £250,000: 5%
  • Portion costing between £250,001 and £325,000: 8%
  • Portion costing between £325,001 and £750,000: 13%
  • Portion costing over £750,001: 15%

Stamp duty in Wales (LTT)

Stamp duty in Wales is called “land transaction tax” (LTT).

For home movers and first-time buyers

  • Portion costing between £0-£180,000: 0%
  • Portion costing between £180,001 and £250,000: 3.5%
  • Portion costing between £250,001 and £400,000: 5%
  • Portion costing between £400,001 and £750,000: 7.5%
  • Portion costing between £750,001 and £1.5m: 10%
  • Portion costing over £1.5m: 12%

For second homes

  • Portion costing between £0-£180,000: 3%
  • Portion costing between £180,001 and £250,000: 6.5%
  • Portion costing between £250,001 and £400,000: 8%
  • Portion costing between £400,001 and £750,000: 10.5%
  • Portion costing between £750,001 and £1.5m: 13%
  • Portion costing over £1.5m: 15%

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How and when do I pay stamp duty?

Your stamp duty bill is due no more than 30 days after you complete the purchase of a property. Your conveyancer will usually send your stamp duty payment to HMRC on your behalf on completion day.

It is sometimes to possible to borrow more from your mortgage lender to fund your stamp duty bill. However, this should be avoided as it means you’ll be paying interest on it for the entirety of your mortgage term.

There is a small list of cases where you’ll be exempt from stamp duty, including with inherited properties, zero-carbon home purchases under £500,000, some Right To Buy transactions and charity purchases. The full list is available on the HMRC website.

Do I have to pay stamp duty?

If a property costs under a specific amount, you won’t have to pay any stamp duty. In England and Northern Ireland, there is no stamp duty charged on properties costing less than £125,000.

There are also other exemptions. You won’t pay stamp duty in the following situations:

  • Property is left to you in a will
  • Property is transferred to you as a gift
  • Property is transferred to you because of divorce or dissolution of a civil partnership
  • You buy a lease of less than seven years (provided it costs less than the stamp duty bill)
  • You use alternative finance arrangements, such as those that comply with sharia law

There are numerous circumstances where you may be eligible for stamp duty relief. These include the following:

  • Some Right To Buy transactions
  • When buying multiple properties
  • House-building companies buying an individual’s home
  • Employers buying an employee’s home
  • Local authorities making compulsory purchases
  • Inter-company property transfers
  • Charities buying property
  • Purchases by registered social landlords

Do first time-buyers pay stamp duty?

Yes, although in November 2017, the tiering system was changed so that first-time buyers wouldn’t pay a penny of stamp duty on purchases under £300,000.

What’s more, they’d only pay 5% on the portion between £300,000 and £500,000.

On the portion above £500,000, the usual rates apply.

Do you have to pay stamp duty on land?

Yes, the same rules and rates apply.

How much stamp duty will we pay when making a joint purchase?

You’ll all need to be first-time buyers to qualify for the preferential rates. Also, if any of you already own a home, you’ll pay the surcharge for second homes.

Bear in mind that spouses and civil partners are considered as one person for stamp duty purposes. So, if your spouse owns a property and you want to buy one in your own name, you’ll still pay the second home surcharge.

How much stamp duty will I pay if I buy a new home before selling my old one?

You’ll have to pay the rate for second homes, but you can claim a refund if you sell your previous home within 36 months of buying the new one. You’ll have 12 months from the sale of your old home to claim this refund.

The same rules apply if you have your name removed from the deeds of a property.

How can we help?

Online mortgage finder

Complete our form to access personalised information on mortgages to suit your particular needs.

Browse mortgage rates

Fast and simple comparison of today’s best rates and overview of mortgage options from a range of UK lenders.

Speak to an adviser

Talk to a fee-free mortgage adviser from our partner L&C. Open 7 days a week, 'til 8pm weekdays. Call free (mobile or landline).

Can I add stamp duty onto my mortgage?

Some lenders will lend you extra money to cover the cost of your stamp duty and add this to your mortgage.

This isn’t ideal though because you’ll be paying interest on this figure for the entirety of your mortgage term.

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