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Investing in copper stocks

A rare earth metal with a wide range of applications. What you should consider before you invest.

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Copper can be found in low concentrations in the earth’s crust. It has an abundance of uses — from our homes to industrial machinery. But it’s difficult and expensive to mine. Here’s what you should know about copper stocks.

What is copper and how is it used?

Copper is a reddish-orange metal that is corrosion-resistant and an excellent conductor of heat and electricity. In its natural state, copper is soft, solid and can be molded into different shapes and thicknesses.

It is naturally found in ore deposits that are mined or leached. Mining crushes and grinds the ore into powder, where the unwanted materials and other impurities are removed. Leaching uses sulphuric acid to remove the copper from the other ore minerals.

Copper has a plethora of uses across five main markets:

  • Construction. Wiring, heating, refrigeration and plumbing all use copper materials.
  • Electrical and electronics. Utilities and electronics need copper wiring and parts.
  • Consumer products. Cookware and household appliances use their fair share of this raw material.
  • Transportation. Vehicles, including airplanes, cars and trucks, are manufactured with copper.
  • Industrial equipment. Machinery consumes millions of pounds of copper every year.

Copper stocks generally refer to companies that explore, develop, produce and sell copper all over the world.

Why invest in copper stocks?

Copper has an expansive range of industrial and consumer applications — from factories and transmission lines to homes and electronics. And the recent push for electric vehicles is likely to increase demand for this essential metal.

Electric vehicles have five times more copper than traditional cars. And this new driving technology will also require large amounts of copper to support its electric charging infrastructure. Copper’s strong ties to many sectors of the economy likely mean that the demand isn’t going anywhere.

Risks of investing in copper

While copper is one of the most abundant metals on earth, only a small portion is economically viable to extract at today’s prices using current technologies. So mining companies are vulnerable to copper price fluctuations, which are easily impacted by geopolitics.

For example, global copper prices fell to its two-year all-time low in 2019. It was collateral damage amid the escalating trade war between the United States and China — a country consumes over 50% of the world’s metal.

An additional risk is that there are other practical substitutes for copper. For example, manufacturers can use aluminum instead of copper in automobile radiators, optical fiber in telecommunications equipment and plastics for pipes and plumbing fixtures. These substitutions can lower demand and cause copper and its stock prices to fall.

Copper stocks

Interested in copper stocks? In addition to the New York Stock Exchange, many copper stocks trade on international exchanges, such as the London and Toronto stock exchanges. Select a company to learn more about what they do and how their stock performs, including market capitalization, the price-to-earnings (P/E) ratio, price/earnings-to-growth (PEG) ratio and dividend yield. While this list includes a selection of the most well-known and popular stocks, it doesn't include every stock available.

What ETFs track the copper category?

These exchange-traded funds (ETFs) track the price of copper:

  • Global X Copper Miners ETF (COPX)
  • United States Copper Index Fund (CPER)
  • iPath Series B Bloomberg Copper Subindex Total Return ETN (JJC)

Compare trading platforms

One of the simplest ways to invest in copper is with a domestic brokerage account, which allows you to buy stocks on the NYSE and NASDAQ. But if you want to invest in international copper stocks, you’ll need an international brokerage account.

Use the table below to compare domestic brokerage accounts.

Name Product Available asset types Stock trade fee Option trade fee Annual fee
Vanguard
Stocks,Mutual funds,ETFs,Forex
$0
$1
$20 per year
Get a personal advisor when you open an account with at least $50,000.
Robinhood
Stocks,Options,ETFs,Cryptocurrency
$0
$0
0%
Make unlimited commission-free trades in stocks, funds, and options with Robinhood Financial.
Interactive Brokers
Stocks,Bonds,Options,Mutual funds,Index funds,ETFs,Forex,Futures,Cash
$0
$0 + $0.65/contract, $1 minimum
0%
IBKR Lite offers $0 commissions, and IBKR Pro offers advanced tools for professional traders.
TD Ameritrade
Stocks,Bonds,Options,Mutual funds,ETFs,Forex,Futures
$0
or $25 If it is broker-assisted
$0 + $0.65/contract,
or $25 Broker-assisted
TD Ameritrade features $0 commission for online stock, but watch out for high short-term ETF and broker-assisted trading fees.
Tastyworks
Stocks,Options,ETFs,Futures
$0
Stocks & ETFs: $1/contract to open, $0 to close, $10 max/leg
Futures: $2.50/contract to open, $0 to close
0%
Trade stocks, options, ETFs and futures on mobile or desktop with this advanced platform.
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Compare up to 4 providers

Disclaimer: The value of any investment can go up or down depending on news, trends and market conditions. We are not investment advisers, so do your own due diligence to understand the risks before you invest.

Bottom line

Copper is involved in a lot of economic sectors. While its consumer and industrial applications keep copper in demand, you’ll need to keep a pulse on global trade wars.

Consider a few different trading platforms that offer international brokerage accounts to add copper to your investment portfolio.

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