Working from home and hybrid working statistics

38% of people work from home at least some of the time. Is hybrid working here to stay?

The pandemic has changed our ways of living, including how we work. While we no longer have the same restrictions, hybrid working has become normal for many of us. Our research found that 38% of Brits, approximately 20 million people, work from home at least some of the time. We look at who is working from home, how working from home affects productivity and the effect of working from home on spending and saving.

Quick overview

  • 38% of Brits, or 20 million people, work from home at least some of the time.
  • 1 in 4 (25%) people work from home occasionally, whilst around 1 in 8 (13%) work from home all the time.
  • This has changed since the first coronavirus lockdown, where 60% of the UK’s adult population worked from home.
  • More than 3 in 4 (78%) of those working from home claimed an improved work-life balance.
  • 43% of 30- to 49-year-olds work from home some of or all the time, more than any other age group.
  • Around half (48%) of people find it difficult to work with others when working from home.
  • Tuesday is the most common work-from-home day, with Friday in a close second.
  • Those earning £40,000 or more a year are the most likely to work from home, with 61% of this bracket doing so.

How many people work from home?

Around 20 million people, or 38% of the UK population, work from home at least some of the time. 1 in 4 (25%) Brits work from home occasionally, whilst around 1 in 8 (13%) work from home all the time.

At the height of the first lockdown, our research found that 60% of the UK’s adult population was working from home some of or all the time, and 26% planned to continue after lockdown.

Is hybrid work here to stay?

Hybrid working has become more popular since the pandemic’s start. The number of people working from home some of the time has grown from 17% to 25%, meaning a quarter of Brits are hybrid workers. Permanently working from home is less popular now, reducing from 43% to 13%.

Date Sometimes work from home Always work from home
Apr 2020 17.40% 43.10%
May 2022 25% 13%

High earners are more likely to hybrid work

Those earning £40,000 or more a year are the most likely to work from home, with 61% of people in this bracket doing so. High earners tend to work from home more, with the percentage of those working from home increasing with income.

The only exception is those earning between £20,000 to £30,000, who work from home 2% less than those earning between £15,000 and £20,000. Those earning £15,000 or less are the least likely to work from home, with just 14% doing so.

Income Bracket WFH some or all of the time
Up to £15,000 14.00%
£15,000 up to £20,000 36.00%
£20,000 up to £30,000 34.00%
£30,000 up to £40,000 48.00%
£40,000 or more 61.00%

How does age impact hybrid working?

Younger people tend to work from home more than their older counterparts. This is especially true for those aged 30 to 49, with 43% working from home some of or all the time. 39% of 16- to 29-year-olds work from home, compared to 34% of those aged 50 to 69.

Those aged 70 and over are the least likely to work from home, with only 17% doing so.

Age Percentage that work from home
16-29 years old 39.00%
30-49 years old 43.00%
50-69 years old 34.00%
70+ years old 17.00%

What is the best day to work from home?

Tuesday is the most popular work-from-home day, with 67% of those WFH claiming they worked from home on Tuesdays. However, there is no big difference between each weekday, with people working from home throughout the week.

Being in the office on Monday is most common, perhaps because companies like to start the week off by catching up in person!

Date Percentage of those working from home that work from home on this day
Monday 58.00%
Tuesday 67.00%
Wednesday 64.00%
Thursday 63.00%
Friday 65.00%

Does working from home improve work-life balance?

In 2022, more than three-quarters (78%) of those who had worked from home claimed it improved their work-life balance. Interestingly, 30- to 49-year-olds were most affected, with 83% of this age group stating an improvement in work-life balance. This may be partly due to the flexibility that working from home offers the parents of young children in this age bracket.

Working from home saves on commute time

The average daily commute time in the UK is 59 minutes. This means people working from home save almost 5 hours a week by omitting their daily commute to the office. As well as being good news for employees, some of this extra time could be spent working – a plus for employers, too.

How does working from home affect productivity?

Employees generally appreciate a company that allows them to work from home, and research has suggested this could also boost productivity for the employer.

  • 65% of workers said they would be more productive in a home office than in a company office.
  • 75% of workers say they are more productive due to reduced distractions.
  • 83% of employees feel they do not need an office to be productive.
  • Two-thirds of employers report increased productivity for remote workers compared to in-office workers.

What are the disadvantages of working from home?

While many believe that working from home increases productivity, the most cited disadvantage of working from home is difficulty collaborating, with nearly half (48%) of people stating that it is harder to work with others when working from home. About 1 in 4 (26%) people are more distracted when working from home, and 1 in 5 (19%) experienced reduced wellbeing.

Surprisingly, 1 in 10 (9%) people found reduced work-life balance when working from home. This may be due to a lack of space between professional life and private life that comes with commuting.

Disadvantages Percentage
Reduced work life balance 9.00%
Slower to complete work 9.00%
Fewer job opportunities 5.00%
More distractions 26.00%
Reduced wellbeing 19.00%
Harder to work with others 48.00%
Harder to think of new ideas 15.00%

Technological challenges

A survey found that many Brits have to use mobile broadband (mobile data) to stay connected. With many offices having faster and more reliable Internet connections than homes, the difficulty of an unreliable Wi-Fi connection can be a significant downside to working from home.

  • 62% of remote workers want employers to provide better technology that helps them stay connected with their colleagues.
  • 36% of Brits regularly switch to mobile broadband to stay online, with 61% saying it has made their working experience better.
  • 47% of survey respondents experienced increased stress due to Internet connectivity issues in their homes. 28% have also considered switching to mobile data for important calls.
  • 67% of working-from-home employees stated mobile data connectivity access as an important factor when deciding where to live in the future.

How much money do you save working from home?

Back when lockdown was first in place, 60% of the UK’s population was working from home. At the time, 9 in 10 (89%) Brits believed this shift would reduce their expenditure, specifically due to a drastic reduction in commuting and buying lunch every day. In reality, the average employed worker saved £44.78 every week.

Percentage that will save Average savings Total savings per week
Working 53.20% £44.78 £2,098,155,913

Savings on working from home per region

Londoners save the most by working from home, with an average of £57.78 per week being pocketed – a possible reflection of the capital’s high commuting costs. The second biggest savers are in Wales, where those working from home are saving £50.16 per week. UK regions where workers report saving the least are Scotland (£35.47), the North East (£35.65) and the South West (£37.47).

Region Saved per week
Northern Ireland £41.62
South West £37.47
South East £46.04
East of England £42.23
West Midlands £39.48
East Midlands £43.96
Yorshire and the Humber £43.40
North West £47.10
North East £35.65
Wales £50.16
Scotland £35.47
London £57.78

Click here for more research. For all media enquiries, please contact

Matt Mckenna

UK Head of Communications

T: +44 20 8191 8806

matt.mckenna@finder.com@MichHutchison/in/matthewmckenna2

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