Compare dental loans

How to get a dental loan in the UK, including dental loans for bad credit and no credit check.

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Learn how to get a loan How dental loans work

Dental work is often pretty pricey, especially if the procedure comes out of the blue. However, considering a personal loan might be a good option to cover these expenses.

Use our table below to see which dental loans you can get, based on your credit score.

Table: sorted by representative APR, promoted deals first
Name Product Ratings Customer rating Finder score Total Payable Monthly Repayment Representative APR Link
Novuna Personal Loan
Finder score
★★★★★
★★★★★
User rating
★★★★★
Expert analysis
Check eligibility
View details
Representative example: Borrow £10,000.00 over 3 years at a rate of 7.4% p.a. (fixed). Representative APR 7.4% and total payable £11,142.00 in monthly repayments of £309.50.
My Community Bank Personal Loan
Finder score
★★★★★
Not yet rated
★★★★★
Expert analysis
Check eligibility
View details
Representative example: Borrow £5,000 over 48 months at a rate of 25.0% pa (fixed). Representative APR 28.1% and total payable £7,955.24 in monthly repayments of £165.73.
Fluro (formerly Lending Works) Personal Loan
Finder score
★★★★★
Not yet rated
★★★★★
Expert analysis
Check eligibility
View details
Representative example: Assumed borrowing of £7,500.00 over 48 months at 17.9% APR representative. Monthly cost of £214.79. Total amount repayable of £10,309.78. Interest rate of 16.6% p.a.(fixed) and total fees of £150.00. Available for loan amounts between £5,000 - £25,000.
Lendwise
Finder score
★★★★★
Not yet rated
★★★★★
Expert analysis
View details
thinkmoney Personal Loan
Finder score
★★★★★
Not yet rated
★★★★★
Expert analysis
View details
Representative example: If you borrow £29,100 over 12 years, initially on a fixed rate for 5 years at 8.885% and for the remaining 7 years on the Lender's standard variable rate of 9.285%, you would make 60 monthly payments of £375.53 and 84 monthly payments of £380.29.
Tesco Bank Clubcard Personal Loan
Finder score
★★★★★
★★★★★
User rating
★★★★★
Expert analysis
View details
Representative example: Borrow £10,000.00 over 3 years at a rate of 6.1% p.a. (fixed). Representative APR 6.1% and total payable £10,941.12 in monthly repayments of £303.92.
Tesco Bank Personal Loan
Finder score
★★★★★
★★★★★
User rating
★★★★★
Expert analysis
View details
Representative example: Borrow £10,000.00 over 3 years at a rate of 6.5% p.a. (fixed). Representative APR 6.5% and total payable £11,003.04 in monthly repayments of £305.64.
Zopa Personal Loan
Finder score
★★★★★
★★★★★
User rating
★★★★★
Expert analysis
View details
Representative example: Borrow £1,500.00 over 3 years at a rate of 22.9% p.a. (fixed). Representative APR 22.9% and total payable £2,028.60 in monthly repayments of £56.35.
Barclays Existing Current Account Loan
Finder score
★★★★★
★★★★★
User rating
★★★★★
Expert analysis
View details
Representative example: Borrow £10,000.00 over 3 years at a rate of 6.1% p.a. (fixed). Representative APR 6.1% and total payable £10,941.12 in monthly repayments of £303.92.
Lloyds Bank Existing Customer Personal Loan
Finder score
★★★★★
Not yet rated
★★★★★
Expert analysis
View details
Representative example: Borrow £10,000.00 over 3 years at a rate of 6.7% p.a. (fixed). Representative APR 6.7% and total payable £11,034.00 in monthly repayments of £306.50.
Plend personal loan
Finder score
★★★★★
Not yet rated
★★★★★
Expert analysis
View details
Representative example: Borrow £8,000 over 48 months at a rate of 16.66% p.a. (fixed). Representative APR 17.99% and total payable £11,013.12 in monthly repayments of £229.44.
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With no guarantor

1 - 1 of 1
Name Product Ratings Customer rating Finder score Total Payable Monthly Repayment Representative APR Link
Finio Loans Personal Loan
Finder score
★★★★★
Not yet rated
★★★★★
Expert analysis
Check eligibility
View details
Representative example: Borrow £10,000.00 over 3 years at a rate of 39.9% p.a. (fixed). Representative APR 39.9% and total payable £16,091.64 in monthly repayments of £446.99.
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With a guarantor

1 - 1 of 1
Name Product Ratings Customer rating Finder score Total Payable Monthly Repayment Representative APR Link
1plus1 Loans Guarantor Loan
Finder score
★★★★★
Not yet rated
★★★★★
Expert analysis
Check eligibility
View details
Representative example: Borrow £10,000.00 over 3 years at a rate of 47.8% p.a. (fixed). Representative APR 47.8% and total payable £17,259.12 in monthly repayments of £479.42.
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With a guarantor who is a homeowner

1 - 1 of 1
Name Product Ratings Customer rating Finder score Total Payable Monthly Repayment Representative APR Link
Norwich Trust Limited Unsecured Homeowner Loan
Finder score
★★★★★
Not yet rated
★★★★★
Expert analysis
View details
Representative example: Borrow £15,000.00 over 3 years at a rate of 27.9% p.a. (fixed). Representative APR 27.9% and total payable £21,430.80 in monthly repayments of £595.30.
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Please note: You should always refer to your loan agreement for exact repayment amounts as they may vary from our results.
Late repayments can cause you serious money problems. See our debt help guides.

What is a dental loan?

A dental loan is any form of personal loan or finance that is used to cover the cost of dental or orthodontic procedures. This can include an unsecured personal loan or credit card, or a payment plan arranged directly with your dentist.

Dental loans jargon explained

  • APR. The annual percentage rate (APR) is a measure of the overall cost of a loan each year, based on the interest rate and any mandatory fees. However, lenders only need to offer the advertised APR to 51% of borrowers, and you could end up being charged a higher rate.
  • Interest rate. This is the percentage amount of interest you’ll pay on your loan, and can be either a fixed or variable rate. Fixed interest rates stay the same over the loan, while variable rates can go up and down.
  • Unsecured loan. An unsecured loan means you don’t need to use an asset, such as a property or vehicle, as collateral against the loan.

How do dental loans work?

If you’re having teeth trouble, the cost of expensive dental care often means you have to just grin and bear it. With a dental loan, you’ll be able to cover any procedure, whether it’s necessary or elective.

You can use a dental loan to borrow money and finance the costs of dental surgery or other related costs. Depending on the type of loan you choose, you may be able to borrow as little as £100 or as much as £20,000.

Generally, the higher your loan amount, the longer you may have to pay it back. Loan terms vary from between 16 days to around seven years, depending on the type of loan you get.

Image of a man with laptop and caption: the average apr of a £5,000 loan is around 8%.

How much does dental work cost?

Most people know dental work can be expensive, but just how much can a visit to the dentist cost? For preventative work, that is, where you visit the dentist for an oral exam, fluoride, or sealing, the costs can be between about £30 to £80, although plaque removal can cost as much as £120.

For surgery, such as extraction, you’re looking closer to £200. For restorative work, including fillings and cusp capping, you should be expecting to pay closer to £300. When you get into full surgical and restorative work, the bill could be anywhere between £800 and £3,000, sometimes more. Braces can cost anywhere between £1,500 and £5,000.

Dental loan cost comparison

Loan amount: £2,000

  • Loan term: 5 years
  • Interest rate: 19.9%
  • Monthly repayment: £51
  • Total interest: £1,066

Loan amount: £2,000

  • Loan term: 5 years
  • Interest rate: 27.9%
  • Monthly repayment: £59
  • Total interest: £1,512

Is dental treatment covered by the NHS?

Dental treatment that is considered clinically necessary by your dentist to maintain good oral health is available on the NHS, but you’ll still need to make a contribution to your treatment. This means the NHS provides any treatment that you need to keep your mouth, teeth, and gums healthy and free of pain. This includes common procedures like dentures, crowns and bridges.

NHS dental treatment does not include cosmetic treatments that are not clinically necessary, such as teeth whitening. Dental implants and orthodontic treatment, such as braces, are covered by the NHS, but only if there’s a medical need for the treatment.

What are my dental finance options?

Before applying for a dental loan, it’s important to know what type of loans are available to you. If you’re looking at getting dental loans then you have a few options open to consider:

  • Unsecured personal loan. With an unsecured personal loan you can apply to borrow between £1,000 and £50,000 and can use the loan amount for almost any purpose you want. These loans are available from both high-street banks and online lenders, with many companies catering to the “non-standard” (bad credit) market. In most cases, the loans come with a fixed term and a fixed rate, so you’ll know in advance exactly how much you’ll pay each month and overall.
  • Credit card. Plenty of cards come with lengthy 0% interest periods on spending, so depending on the card and credit limit you’re eligible for (approval and credit limits are subject to each card issuer’s assessment of your unique circumstances), you may be able to cover the costs of dental work. Just keep in mind that with no set repayment period, you may fall into a cycle of expensive debt if you don’t keep on top of your payments.
  • Overdraft. Most current accounts come with an overdraft facility – where the bank allows you to continue spending even when your account is empty, up to a specified limit. Go beyond this limit and you’ll usually incur pretty painful daily fees. Unless you’re a student with a specialised student current account, overdrafts tend not to be a cheap way to borrow, despite their convenience.
  • Specialist dental finance. There are some lenders that offer loans tailored to dentistry and can help you finance a range of procedures. Specialist loans include payment plans through your dentist as well as third-party providers. Ultimately it’s just a loan however, and you should compare it against the other products here to see what your cheapest option would be.
  • Short term loan. These loans, also called payday loans, are usually for amounts between £100 and £1,000 and may be an option if you need finance for emergency dental surgery. Payday lenders usually offer a quick turnaround time, with some lenders able to send you your loan amount within 60 minutes. However, payday loans must be seen as a last resort as they come with extremely high interest rates and as such are very expensive. It’s always better to exhaust all other options before you consider a payday loan.

Finder survey: How would you pay for significant dental work?

Response% of respondents
Short-term loan8.70%
Personal loan2.17%
Overdraft4.35%
Other2.17%
In advance as part of a plan19.57%
Debit card26.09%
Credit card13.04%
Cash15.22%
Borrow from friends/family8.70%
Source: Finder survey by Finder of Finder members

Can I get a dental loan with bad credit?

Yes, you can still get a loan to finance dental costs if you have poor credit, but you may be limited in how many finance options you have. Lenders are unlikely to approve unsecured loans for things like cosmetic dental procedures if the borrower has a bad credit history, and you may also be ineligible for a number of credit cards.

However, there are some lenders that specialise in providing loans for bad credit, and you may also be able to get a short-term loan with bad credit. Short-term loans can also be offered without a hard credit check, but should only be considered a last resort when it comes to financing dental work.

How you can compare your dental finance options

Here are some questions to ask yourself that will help you come to a decision:

  • What repayments can I afford? Depending on whether the rate being offered is fixed or variable, you should be able to work out a rough idea of what your repayments will be based on the loan’s interest rate and ongoing fees. See if this repayment will work with your budget.
  • How much do I need to borrow? Lenders place restrictions on how much you can borrow with certain loan products, so check to see their minimum and maximum loan amounts before you apply. Keep in mind you may not be approved for the full amount you want, regardless of whether it’s below their maximum amount offered, as this will depend on your income and credit history.
  • When do I need the money? Different lenders will offer different turnaround times, so it might be worth talking to the lender to find out when you could expect to be approved before you apply. If you need money quickly, check to see if your bank offers same-day loans for existing customers.
  • What is my credit history like? If you have any negative marks on your credit report, you will be restricted as to what kind of finance you can access. Check the eligibility criteria offered by lenders, or you may want to consider a payday lender, although that should be a last resort option as payday loans are extremely expensive.

Personal loans glossary

  • APR. The annual percentage rate (APR) is designed to be a benchmark for consumers, providing an annual summary of the cost of a loan. As well as the interest, the APR also takes into account any compulsory charges – like an “admin” or “set-up” fee (if there is one). However, crucially, lenders only have to award the advertised APR to 51% of those who take out the loan – the other 49% could be offered a different (higher) rate, at the lender’s discretion. That’s why it’s often referred to as the representative APR.
  • Broker. Unlike a direct lender, a broker does not lend money but instead helps you to find a suitable lender.
  • Capital. Also referred to as the “principal” or “loan amount”, this is the original amount borrowed.
  • Credit check. Also referred to as a “credit search”, this is a background check run by lenders considering a loan application. The lender will request visibility of your credit record from a credit reference agency, and will use the information in the record to help make a decision on whether or not to offer you a loan, and, in some cases, what rate to offer.
  • Credit reference agency (CRA). Credit reference agencies are the companies who hold your credit history. Lenders report borrowing activity to these agencies, and request information from them (a credit search) when considering applications for credit. The three main CRAs in the UK are Experian, Equifax and TransUnion (formerly CallCredit).
  • Default. Defaulting on a loan means failing to make a pre-agreed repayment at the specified time. This will typically result in the borrower being charged a penalty plus damage to the borrower’s credit record.
  • Direct lender. The term “direct lender” is used by lenders to distinguish themselves from brokers. A direct lender issues loans, while a broker refers you to a direct lender to get your loan.
  • Drawdown. Drawing down simply refers to the transfer of funds to the borrower at the start of a loan.
  • Eligibility criteria. A list of conditions that a borrower must meet in order to be considered for a loan. These vary from lender to lender.
  • Fixed rate. A fixed rate will not change for an agreed amount of time, even if market conditions mean that bank interest rates generally are increasing or decreasing. A fixed rate can be a popular option for some borrowers, and it allows them to budget with more certainty – knowing in advance the exact cost of a loan and the exact figure for each instalment.
  • Guarantor. An individual who promises to repay a loan in the event that the borrower does not. Typically a friend or relative of the borrower.
  • Instalment. A repayment towards an outstanding loan. This will normally consist partly of interest accrued so far, and partly of a proportion of the original sum borrowed.
  • Interest rate. The interest rate is a charge for borrowing, and is a percentage of the amount of credit.
  • Loan term. The amount of time over which a loan is to be repaid.
  • Principal. Also referred to as the “capital” or “loan amount”, this is the original amount borrowed.
  • Repayment holiday. An agreed period (normally either one or two months) where the borrower will not make repayments. The debt continues to accrue interest during this period, so taking a repayment holiday will generally increase the total cost of borrowing (and the loan term). Repayment holidays are typically offered to borrowers at the start of a loan, or at a specified frequency – for example one per year.
  • Unsecured. An unsecured loan does not use an asset, such as a property or vehicle, as collateral for the loan.
  • Variable rate. A variable rate is the opposite of a fixed rate, and can increase or decrease over time at the lender’s discretion. Typically, variations occur as market conditions generally shift – for example in increase or decrease in the Bank of England base rate.

How you can apply for a dental loan

The application process will differ depending on the lender you apply with, as will the eligibility criteria.

Check your options before you borrow

  • To receive free and impartial advice and for information about other options for managing bills and debts, visit moneyadviceservice.org.uk.
  • Talk to the company you owe money to and see if there are any payment options or plans available to reduce stress and worry
  • If you are on government benefits, ask if you can receive an advance or help from your local authority
We show offers we can track - that's not every product on the market...yet. Unless we've said otherwise, products are in no particular order. The terms "best", "top", "cheap" (and variations of these) aren't ratings, though we always explain what's great about a product when we highlight it. This is subject to our terms of use. When you make major financial decisions, consider getting independent financial advice. Always consider your own circumstances when you compare products so you get what's right for you.

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