Easter eggs vs chocolate bars

How much is spent on Easter eggs?

Georgia-Rose Johnson

by , Shopping & Travel Publisher

With around 80 million Easter eggs sold every year, it’s no secret that Brits love to indulge over Easter, but are you getting a good deal when satisfying your Easter sweet tooth? We have carried out some research to help you choose a good value Easter egg, and you can also check out a range of egg-cellent gift ideas here.

Easter egg spending

Our research found that an estimated £381 million will be spent on Easter eggs this year; this is £154 million more than if consumers bought the same amount of chocolate but in bar form (£227 million). Each consumer could save £4.28 by purchasing chocolate bars, overall making Easter eggs 68% more expensive than chocolate bars (although it’s not as fun to tuck into a plain chocolate bar during Easter!).

Easter eggs vs chocolate bars

We went further down the rabbit hole to discover what chocolate brands have the largest differences between the cost of their Easter eggs and chocolate bars. Of all the brands analysed, the worst offender was Galaxy: per 100g an Easter egg costs £1.71, which is nearly £1 more expensive than the cost per 100g of a Galaxy bar (£0.75). The best deal on the market is the Cadbury Oreo egg, coming in at only £0.47 more per 100g than for the bar.

Methodology

The costs of Easter eggs and the chocolate equivalent were taken from Tesco.com.
Finder commissioned Onepoll to carry out a nationally representative survey of adults aged 18+.
A total of 2,000 people were questioned throughout Great Britain, with representative quotas for gender, age and region.

For all media enquiries, please contact

Matt Mckenna
UK Communications Manager
M: +44 747 921 7816
T: +44 20 3828 1338
matt.mckenna@finder.com@MichHutchison/in/matthewmckenna2

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