Business credit cards with high limits

See how to access a business credit card with the credit limit you need.

Compare cards with high credit limits Check your eligibility now
Learn more about credit limits How providers calculate limits

A high credit limit business credit card can give you the flexibility you need to manage the cash flow of your business. Use the table below to compare business credit and charge cards that allow high credit limits, and then read the rest of the tips we’ve uncovered on how to access a business credit card with a high limit, and how to know whether it’s the right choice for you.

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Name Product Purchases Annual/monthly fees Credit limits Representative APR Link Key benefit Representative example
Finder Award
CASHBACK
Capital on Tap Business Credit Card
35.15%
£0
Min. limit £1,000, max. limit £250,000.
35.2% APR (variable)
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Earn 1 point for every £1 of card spend. Redeem 1 point for 1p (1% cashback)
Representative example: When you spend £1,200 at a purchase rate of 35.15% (variable) p.a., your representative rate is 35.2% APR (variable).
Barclaycard Payments Select Cashback Business Credit Card
27.5%
£0
Min. limit £1,000, max. limit £25,000.
27.5% APR (variable)
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*Get 1% uncapped cashback on all your business spend. T&Cs apply.
Representative example: When you spend £1,200 at a purchase rate of 27.5% (variable) p.a., your representative rate is 27.5% APR (variable).
Finder Award
CASHBACK
Capital on Tap Business Credit Card (+optional Business Rewards)
35.15%
£99 per annum
Min. limit £1,000, max. limit £250,000.
35.15% APR (variable)
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Representative example: When you spend £1,200 at a purchase rate of 35.15% (variable) p.a., your representative rate is 35.15% APR (variable). Optional upgrade to Business Rewards (£99 per year).
Barclaycard Select Charge Card
N/A (this product is a charge card).
£42 per annum
Min. limit £1,000, max. limit £50,000.
3.6% APR (variable)
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Control spend and manage business expenses. Access to business rewards with discounts and offers from leading retailers and suppliers. T&Cs apply.
American Express Business Gold Card
N/A (this product is a charge card).
Year 1 - £0, Year 2 onwards - £195
Min. limit not specified, max. limit not specified.
N/A (this product is a charge card).
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Earn 20,000 bonus Membership Rewards® points when you spend £3,000 in the first 3 months. Terms apply.
American Express Business Platinum Card
N/A (this product is a charge card).
£650
Min. limit not specified, max. limit not specified.
N/A (this product is a charge card).
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Earn 40,000 bonus Membership Rewards® points when you spend £6,000 in the first 3 months. Terms apply.
Barclaycard Premium Plus Business Credit Card Mastercard
0% for 6 months reverting to 20.2%
£150 per annum
Min. limit £1,000, max. limit £25,000.
56.8% APR (variable)
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*Get 0.5% cashback on your business spend up to £400 per year and benefits for using your card for day-to-day business and travel. £150 a year. T&Cs apply.
Representative example: When you spend £1,200 at a purchase rate of 20.2% (variable) p.a. with a fee of £150 per annum, your representative rate is 56.8% APR (variable).
RBS Business Credit Card (only available to existing business customers)
16.9%
Year 1 - £0, Year 2 onwards - £30 per annum
Min. limit £500, max. limit not specified.
24.3% APR (variable)
Representative example: When you spend £1,200 at a purchase rate of 16.9% (variable) p.a. with a fee of Year 1 - £0, Year 2 onwards - £30 per annum, your representative rate is 24.3% APR (variable).
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What is considered a high credit limit business credit card?

You probably know that a business credit card is one that you can use to pay for business expenses and to help manage your company’s cash flow. Business owners also have the option to give supplementary cards to employees and set individual credit limits for each of them, as long as the total business spend doesn’t go over the overall credit limit for the business.

A high-limit credit card is simply one that gives you access to a larger amount of credit. When we talk about higher limits for business credit cards, we usually mean anything over £10,000 or so.

How do credit card providers decide credit limits?

When you apply for a business credit or charge card, the lender will conduct an assessment of your business’s financial history, including your trading history, turnover and profit.

The lender will also check your business credit score. This is a numerical indicator of how reliably your business pays back debts, based on your company’s previous credit history. The bigger your profits and the longer you’ve been trading, the more likely you’ll be trusted with a high credit limit, and a lower interest rate, on your credit card.

The average credit limit on a business credit card tends to be higher than it is for personal credit cards. With an average financial standing, you can expect to be offered between £1,000 and £10,000. But if your financial history indicates that you’re an extremely reliable business to lend to, you could be offered five times this amount, or even more.

And your credit limit isn’t set in stone when your loan application is approved. Many lenders are happy to consider raising your credit limit after you’ve made a few timely monthly repayments on your card.

Credit card jargon explained

  • APR. The annual percentage rate (APR) is a benchmark for consumers, providing an annual summary of the cost of your card, including any account fees or other compulsory charges as well as interest. However, crucially, providers only have to award the advertised APR to 51% of those who take out the credit card – the other 49% could be offered a different (higher) rate, at the provider’s discretion. That’s why it’s often called the representative APR.
  • Charge card. This is a type of card that doesn’t come with a set credit limit, but requires you to pay off your balance in full each month.
  • Earn rate. This is a measure of how many reward points you’ll earn on your card transactions. For example, a credit card may have an earn rate of 1 point per £1 spent, meaning if you spend £5,000, you get 5000 points.
  • Purchase rate.This is the percentage rate you’ll be charged on all purchases made using your credit card if you don’t pay off your balance before the end of your interest-free period. It can be either a fixed rate, which means it stays the same over time, or variable, which means it changes.

How to compare high-limit business credit cards

When you’re in the market for a high-limit business credit card, you should compare the following features:

  1. Eligibility checker results. Most card issuers now let you check your likelihood of being approved for a card before you apply, without affecting your credit score, and they’ll sometimes give an indication of the rate and limit you might be offered.
  2. APR. See the definition above. This is the interest rate you’ll pay on outstanding balances. Many cards may offer introductory 0% interest periods as an incentive to apply for the card.
  3. Perks and bonuses. There are plenty of business credit cards that incentivise frequent spending with cashback or reward points. If you frequently engage in business travel, consider looking for a credit card that offers air miles, provides travel insurance as a perk, or connects you to a membership rewards points scheme with a hotel chain.
  4. Rates and fees.Credit card costs can be pretty fiddly, with the potential for different parts of your card balance to be charged different rates of interest. Look out for each card’s “summary box”, often the quickest way to cut through the marketing spiel, and check for any “hidden” fees that are applicable to you. For example, if you do travel a lot, be sure to check how much each card charges in foreign transaction fees.

What is a business charge card?

Charge cards are payment cards which work similarly to credit cards. Here are the key differences:

  • Annual fees can be higher than most credit cards. Charge cards tend to have higher annual fees to equate for their high credit limits and boastful rewards.
  • No balance. You must pay off your balance in full each month.
  • No interest. Since you can’t carry a balance, you won’t accrue any interest.
  • No or high preset spending limits. Ideal if you want a business card with a high spending limit; but this doesn’t mean unlimited spending. Your purchasing power constantly adjusts based on your payment history and other factors.
  • Lucrative rewards schemes. Charge cards tend to come with generous welcome bonuses and beaming rewards schemes to match their high annual fees. But as with any form of credit, you should only spend as much as you can afford to pay back (especially as you need to repay your balance in full with this type of card) and try not to chase points.

With a charge card, you must settle the full account balance at the end of the statement period. Interest rates don’t apply to charge cards as there is no revolving credit, but often apply hefty late fees for unpaid balances by the due date.

Credit card cost comparison

Credit card limit: £30,000

  • Outstanding balance: £8,000
  • Interest rate: 24%
  • Monthly repayment: £500
  • Total interest: £1,529

Credit card limit: £30,000

  • Outstanding balance: £8,000
  • Interest rate: 36%
  • Monthly repayment: £500
  • Total interest: £2,471

Bottom line

If you’re considering applying for a high-limit credit card for your business, bear in mind you’ll almost certainly need a fantastic business credit score and a stellar financial history. If your business doesn’t have this, you could apply for a charge card, or a credit card with a smaller limit, and build your credit history by making your repayments on this card on time.

If you’re still not sure which credit card would be best for your business, compare your options and check out other business credit cards until you find the right one.

Frequently asked questions

We show offers we can track - that's not every product on the market...yet. Unless we've said otherwise, products are in no particular order. The terms "best", "top", "cheap" (and variations of these) aren't ratings, though we always explain what's great about a product when we highlight it. This is subject to our terms of use. When you make major financial decisions, consider getting independent financial advice. Always consider your own circumstances when you compare products so you get what's right for you. Most of the data in Finder's comparison tables has the source: Moneyfacts Group PLC. In other cases, Finder has sourced data directly from providers.

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