What is an SBA loan?

Government-backed financing designed for small businesses that have struggled to find funding elsewhere.

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The Small Business Administration (SBA) offers a range of loans to small businesses who’ve struggled to qualify for funding in the past. With so many different options to choose from, knowing the basics of each can help you find the one that best meets your business’s needs.

What is an SBA loan?

SBA loans are small business loans backed by the Small Business Administration (SBA) that banks, credit unions, community development financial institutions and online lenders offer. Because they’re guaranteed by the federal government, lenders are more likely to offer competitive rates and larger loan amounts. However, exact terms, interest rates and SBA guarantee fees will vary based on the type of loan you’re interested in.

To qualify, your business needs to prove it’s struggled to find financing elsewhere — on top of meeting other stringent requirements set by the SBA. And you can expect this to be a slow process. The lengthy application can take months to complete — and includes submitting your personal resume as well as a business plan that covers what your company does and how it stands out from the competition.

What types of SBA loans are available?

There are seven SBA loan programs available to small business owners:

  • SBA 7(a) loans. These general-use loans can be used for almost any legal purpose — from covering payroll to buying inventory to consolidating debt. And you won’t be required to provide collateral for smaller amounts.
  • SBA Express loans. A small-dollar version of the 7(a) loan, these loans have a much faster turnaround and require less paperwork — so you won’t have to commit months to the application process.
  • SBA 504 loans. Also known as Certified Development Company (CDC) loans, these are tailored to businesses looking to expand by purchasing real estate or expensive equipment.
  • SBA CAPLines. Revolving or fixed lines of credit designed to help businesses finance a real estate or construction project, prep for seasonal sales, fill a contract or access working capital during a sales slump.
  • SBA Community Advantage loans. Available to businesses that work in underserved communities, these microloans are accessible even if you have poor credit, low revenue or limited experience in your industry.
  • SBA disaster loans. Financing designed to help both businesses and homeowners recover after a natural disaster. These loans are also open to businesses owned by military members on active or reserve duty.

How much can I borrow?

You may be able to borrow as little as $500 up to $5 million — it all depends on the type of SBA loan you’re interested in. How much you qualify for will also depend on your personal and business credit scores, annual revenue, collateral you have available and your business’s current debts.

How can I apply for an SBA loan?

You may be able to apply for an SBA loan online or in person — it depends on the lender you go with. There are also online connection services that can help you find a lender you qualify with, and also apply for funding.

While the exact application and forms required will vary by lender, expect to provide a variety of documentation — including information about your business’s finances and each business partner. Before you get started, ask your lender what’s required to ensure you’re not wasting time on the wrong paperwork.

Our step-by-step guide to applying for an SBA loan

Is a loan connection service a direct lender?

No, an SBA loan connection service isn’t a direct lender. Instead, it’s a third party that works to match you with lenders you might qualify with that have been approved by the SBA. You can also use the SBA Lender Match service to find an approved lender to work with your small business.

How long does it take to get an SBA loan?

The entire process to get an SBA loan can take months from start to finish. The most time-consuming part is filling out the different forms and gathering all of the required documentation.

Once the application is in, you can expect to hear back about a decision in five to 10 business days. However, there are two notable exceptions: The SBA Express loan has a turnaround time of just 36 hours, and the SBA Export Express loan has a turnaround time of just 24 hours.

This doesn’t mean you’ll be funded that quickly, however. After you hear back about approval, it can take a couple more weeks for your loan to be funded.

Compare SBA loan providers

Updated February 28th, 2020
Name Product Filter Values Min. Amount Max. Amount Requirements
National Business Capital Hybridge SBA Loan™
$30,000
$5,000,000
$100,000+ in annual revenue, 2+ years in business, 685+ personal credit score.
Get short-term funding in as little as 24 hours, plus your fully expedited SBA loan in as little as 45 days.
SmartBiz SBA Loans
$30,000
$5,000,000
650+ personal credit score, US citizen or permanent resident, 2+ years in business, $50,000+ annual revenue, no outstanding tax liens, no bankruptcies or foreclosures in past 3 years
Get funding for your small business with a government-backed loan and extended repayment terms.
LendingTree Business Loans
Varies by lender and type of financing
Varies by lender and type of financing
Varies by lender, but many require good personal credit, minimum annual revenue and minimum time in business
Multiple business financing options in one place including: small business loans, lines of credit, SBA loans, equipment financing and more.
Excel Capital Management Small Business Loans
Varies by loan type
Varies by loan type
Your business must operate in the US, be at least 1 year old and have monthly revenue of $15,000+.
Get personalized financing options that suit your unique business needs in just a few simple steps.

Compare up to 4 providers

How do repayments work?

Repayments are generally made monthly, and many SBA loans are amortized — meaning you’ll pay more toward interest than the principal at the beginning of your loan. Depending on the type of financing you opt for, your term may last anywhere from five to 30 years.

What happens if I can’t repay the loan?

After you’ve received a notice regarding your missed payments, a lender may declare your loan is in default if you’re unable to reach a compromise. From here, two things will happen:

  • Your lender may repossess any collateral you used to secure your loan.
  • Your lender may go after your personal assets, including your property, retirement savings and bank accounts.

If this still isn’t enough to repay your loan, your lender may transfer it to the SBA. At this point, you can submit an offer in compromise (OIC) to try to reach a settlement. But if a settlement isn’t possible, your loan may be transferred again — this time to the US Treasury Department. Your wages could be garnished and your tax refunds withheld until your loan is fully paid off.

A full list of consequences for defaulting on an SBA loan

Can I pay off an SBA loan early?

It depends on your lender. Because SBA loans aren’t issued by the SBA itself, you’ll need to check your specific loan agreement for potential fees for early repayment.

Many lenders charge a prepayment penalty — either a flat fee or a percentage of the loan amount — if you decide to pay off your loan before the term is up. And if your loan amortizes, you may have paid more toward interest than the principal, leaving you with a high payoff amount.

4 alternatives to an SBA loan

If you don’t have the time to invest in a lengthy SBA loan application or your business doesn’t qualify, you might want to consider one of these alternatives:

  • Business loan or line of credit. Banks, credit unions and online lenders also offer their own suite of business loans and lines of credit outside of the SBA. These may have higher rates, but they’re typically easier to qualify for and funded faster than SBA loans.
  • Business credit card. A business credit card is ideal for smaller, everyday expenses. As a bonus, you can build your business’s credit history and many offer cash back or travel rewards for every dollar you spend.
  • Small business grant. Run a nonprofit that doesn’t qualify for SBA financing? Or own a for-profit company that strives to make a positive impact? You might want to look into small business grants. Offered through government agencies and private corporations, these are funds geared toward specific types of businesses or business owners that you don’t need to pay back.
  • Personal loan. You might be able to use a personal loan for business expenses, depending on the lender. While these typically come with less competitive rates than an SBA or business loan, they can be a good option for startups or businesses less than six months old.

Bottom line

Taking out a business loan backed by the SBA can help you qualify for more competitive rates and terms than you might have found elsewhere. But with a lengthy application that can take months to complete, you might want to learn more about how the SBA loan process works before getting started.

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