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Credit card mail offers: What to do with them

See whether you’re preselected or preapproved for certain credit card offers.

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Receiving credit card offers in the mail can be both a bit annoying and useful — annoying because it’s just more paper to deal with, but useful because it clues you in that you likely have a high chance of approval for that credit card. But if you find such offers to be more annoying than useful, you can always opt-out to never receive another offer.

What to do with credit card mail offers

This largely depends on whether you’re looking to get a new card or not.

If you’re looking for a new credit card

Read the terms and conditions to determine whether you’re getting a good deal. Here are things to look for:

  • Rewards.
    With a good credit score or higher, chances are you’ll be getting a credit card mail offer for a rewards credit card. See the rewards categories and consider whether the card is worth it.
  • Interest rates.
    The APR is the interest you’ll be paying on your balance transfer or on your purchases if you carry a balance. If the card comes with a 0% intro APR period or a low APR, it could be worth considering; especially if you’re planning to make a large purchase or to move your balance from a high-APR credit card.
  • Credit limit.
    Check if your credit card offer comes with a high enough credit line for your needs. On the other hand, if the credit limit isn’t as high as you need it to be, you can always request a credit limit increase after a few months of card use.
  • Annual fee.
    As a bonus, if the new credit card offer comes with a rewards program, an intro APR period and it has no annual fee, it could definitely be worth considering.

Why am I getting credit card mail offers?

A common reason you might receive credit card offers in the mail is because of good credit. If you have good credit, issuers see you as a good prospective cardholder.

You might also receive credit card mail offers for the opposite reason: bad credit. In this case, an issuer may want to sway you toward opening a credit-building card. Either way, issuers are always on the lookout for new customers and tailor these offers to your financial circumstances.

How to stop getting credit card offers

You can safely delete your credit card mail offer if it’s delivered online, or shred the physical copy if you received it via snail mail. Credit card mail offers may contain sensitive information, so it’s important no one else gets a hold of it.

If you’re tired of getting credit card offers by mail, here’s what to do:

  1. Call 888-567-8688 or visit www.optoutprescreen.com.
  2. If you went online, scroll down the page and click Click here to opt-in or opt-out.
  3. Select either Electronic opt-out for five years or Permanent opt-out by mail.
  4. Fill out the form and submit.

If you selected to opt-out permanently, you need to print and sign the permanent opt-out election form. Mail the form at the provided address on the website.

If you ever change your mind, you can opt-in again.

What kind of credit card mail offers can I get?

There are two most common credit card mail offers you can receive:

  • Preselected.
    This type of offer is based on your credit history — which means it matches the card issuer’s approval criteria — but the card issuer needs more information before they can approve your application.
  • Preapproved.
    Card issuers have already accessed your credit details and believe you are a good fit for their cards. This credit card offer has the highest approval rating, but it’s not a guarantee you’ll be approved.

Pros and cons of getting credit card offers

Before you decide whether to opt-out from getting credit card mail offers, here’s what to consider:

Pros

  • It helps you see offers you could otherwise miss.
  • You can always ignore offers you don’t like.
  • You can see your approval chances before you apply.

Cons

  • You may get offers for predatory cards with high fees and interest.
  • You could be a victim of fraud if someone gets a hold of sensitive information.

Compare credit cards

You may be constantly getting credit card offers by mail, but they could be useless compared to other credit cards you could apply for. Compare the credit card offers that best fit your financial needs.

Name Product Filter values Rewards Purchase APR Annual fee
Citi® Diamond Preferred® Card
N/A
0% intro for the first 18 months (then 14.74% to 24.74% variable)
$0
Long 18 months intro APR periods on purchases and balance transfers. Plus Citi Entertainment℠ for deals on dining and going out.
Citi® Double Cash Card
Up to 2% cash back on purchases (1% when you buy plus 1% as you pay)
13.99% to 23.99% variable
$0
This one of the most valuable flat cashback cards. It comes with 2% cash back (1% when you buy plus 1% when you pay) and 18 months to pay off transfers.
CardMatch™ from creditcards.com
See terms
See issuer's website
See terms
Use the CardMatch tool to find cards you're likely to qualify for with your credit score, without a hard pull on your credit.
TD Cash Credit Card
3% on dining, 2% at grocery stores and 1% on all other eligible purchases
0% intro for the first 15 billing cycles (then 12.99%, 17.99% or 22.99% variable)
$0
3% on dining and 2% on groceries make this a valuable card for food purchases. Use it while traveling, too, with no foreign transaction fees. Available in: CT, DC, DE, FL, MA, MD, ME, NC, NH, NJ, NY, PA, RI, SC, VA, VT
Luxury Card Mastercard® Titanium Card™
1x points on all purchases with 2% point value when you redeem for airfare and 1% for cash back
14.99% variable
$195
Enjoy unique excursions, privileged access to exclusive events and insider opportunities.
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Bottom line

Credit card mail offers could be useful if you want to know your approval chances and terms for certain credit cards. Keep in mind, getting a credit card offer doesn’t guarantee approval; it only means you have high chances of approval.

But sometimes, you can find better cards that fit your financial needs by looking for credit cards on your own.

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