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12 youth financial literacy programs

These programs help kids build healthy money habits.

About 66.9% of American adults believe that financial literacy should be a mandatory part of school curriculum, according to a Finder.com study. With a push for more financial literacy education, our financial experts pulled together a list of financial courses with lesson plans, videos, games and quizzes on standby for parents and teachers to use.

Financial literacy programs in the US

Program nameBest forCostFeatures
EVERFITeachers teaching grades 4–12Free5–7 ready-made lesson plans and games for financial literacy, covering:

  • Banking
  • Budgeting
  • Credit
  • Debt
  • Employment
  • Student loans
  • Taxes
Fifth Third Bank Young Bankers ClubTeachers teaching grades 4–6FreeThis 8-week program teaches kids how to apply financial knowledge with the help of Maximillion Money, a character that guides kids through a financial literacy game.

Kids learn:

  • Basic money calculations
  • Banking
  • Budgeting and spending
  • Loans
  • Jobs and income
  • Saving
  • Investing in stocks
  • Risk and insurance
Hands on Banking for YouthParents and teachers of grades 1–12FreeTeachers and parents get access to 3–8 lesson plans, worksheets and engaging activities for each grade, teaching:

  • Coins
  • Earning money
  • Budgeting and spending
  • Saving
  • Giving to charity
  • Taxes
  • Insurance
Jump$tart ClearinghouseParents and teachers of kindergarten through adulthoodFreeSearch this library to find over 800 resources developed by educators and experts, including quizzes and games.

Resources cover everything from:

  • Allowances
  • Balancing a budget
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Investing
  • Taxes
  • Inflation
  • And more
Money 101 by StepHigh schoolers in one of Step’s 100+ participating schoolsFreeHigh schoolers run through 6 lessons online via Step’s app, learning about:

  • Banking
  • Budgeting
  • Saving
  • Credit
  • Loans
  • Stocks and crypto investing
Money Smart for Young People by the FDICParents and teachers of pre-K–12FreeGet 6–22 printable lesson plans, handouts and teaching slides per grade, covering everything from:

  • Earning
  • Saving
  • Giving
  • Loans
  • Careers
  • Homeownership
  • Retirement
  • Insurance
MoneyTimeParents and teachers of grades 6–8$12.95 per month or $66 per year for one child
25% off to add children
This program provides 30 turnkey lesson plans with quizzes and a money management game that simulates real-life financial choices.

Kids learn:

  • Saving
  • Jobs and income
  • Spending
  • Borrowing
  • Buying real estate
  • Investing
  • Taxes
Operation HOPEPrograms designed for all ages for schools or personal developmentFreeVirtual learning program led by financial coaches and volunteers. Young adults can attend in-person workshops and 1:1 mentoring.
Programs cover:

  • Budgeting
  • Savings
  • Credit
  • Debt
  • Income
  • Identity protection
Schwab MoneywiseParents and teachers of grades pre-K–12thFreeParents and kids explore videos and lessons, while teachers tap curriculums developed by fellow teachers.

Kids learn:

  • Saving
  • Spending
  • Investing
  • Business
  • Economy
  • Cryptocurrency
  • Insurance
School SavingsParents who volunteer at their kids’ schoolsFreeThis program, approved by the US Department of Education, helps kids make savings deposits at school through Websaver.

It features:

  • An online savings register
  • Animated budgeting app
  • Prizes for kids who save throughout the year
Teach Children to Save DayParents or teachers of grades K–8FreeReach out to participating banks to set up a one-time educational event, taught by volunteer banks.

Events may cover:

  • Managing credit
  • Starting savings habits
  • Banking career
  • Budgeting
  • Needs vs. wants
  • Paying for college
TD Bank WOW!ZoneTeachers of grades K–12FreeThis program provides up to 10 lesson plans per grade and even TD Bank financial instructors, teaching:

  • History of money
  • Smart spending
  • Saving
  • Traditional and alternative banking
  • Types of credit
  • Careers and entrepreneurship
  • Virtual stock market game

Other financial literacy tools

Lessons and games aside, your child can also learn the ins and outs of managing money through top-notch kids’ debit cards designed to empower them to build healthy spending and saving skills. Some popular cards include:

  1. BusyKid. This card helps your kids manage chores and automatically save part of their allowance while offering the chance to invest in stocks and give to charity.
  2. FamZoo. This highly customizable account lets kids set up a budget and track chores and expenses. Parents can also split family bills and start a mock loan with interest that kids have to repay.
  3. Greenlight. This card is packed with features that help parents limit their kids’ spending per store. It also offers investing for kids, a 1% to 5% savings bonus and cash back on debit card purchases.
  4. Jassby. Along with allowance and chore tools, Jassby encourages kids’ financial learning by rewarding them with points for completing tasks. Kids can cash out for money at 100 points.
  5. Step. Not only does Step help kids build credit just by managing their money through the app, but it also lets kids earn cash back in stores and save money using its round-up savings feature.

Bottom line

Kids can learn a variety of money skills, from counting coins to starting their savings. It’s never too early to teach your kids about money or provide them with the resources and tools to start. The point is to start the conversation so they can grow in financial literacy over time.

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