Best business savings accounts for 2024

Is your UK business looking for a savings account? Compare rates and find the best account for your business.

Promoted for high interest
Tide – Tide Instant Saver logo
Go to site
Earn 4.33% AER
Easy access savings
No limits on withdrawals
Fast application
Promoted for daily-paid interest
Revolut Business Savings logo
Go to site
Earn up to 3.51% AER
Daily-paid interest
Instant access
Apply in minutes
Promoted for fast application
Monzo Business Savings logo
Go to site
Earn 1.6% AER
Earn interest on your savings
Fully regulated UK bank
Schedule regular payments

Compare business savings accounts

Table: sorted by promoted deals first
Name Product Interest rate and type Interest paid Invest Term Open via Incentive Table product description Apply link
OFFER
Tide – Tide Instant Saver
4.33% AER variable
Monthly
From £1
Instant access
Open via: website, mobile app
Flexible and easy access to savings with no limits or fees on withdrawals.
Go to site
View details
OFFER
Revolut Business Savings
3.51% AER variable
Daily
Up to £2,000,000
Instant access
Open via: mobile app
Add or withdraw money with zero restrictions, whenever you need to, instantly.
Go to site
View details
OFFER
Monzo Business Savings
1.6% AER variable
Monthly
Up to £100,000
Instant access
Open via: mobile app
A free business account with a linked savings pot.
Go to site
View details
OFFER
Mettle Business Savings
1.46% AER variable
Monthly
Up to £1,000,000
Instant access
Open via: mobile app
A free business account with a linked savings pot.
Go to site
View details
United Trust Bank – Business 1 Year Bond
United Trust Bank – Business 1 Year Bond
5% AER fixed
On maturity
£5,000 - £5,000,000
1 year
Open via: website, post
Go to site
View details
United Trust Bank – Business 3 Month Bond
United Trust Bank – Business 3 Month Bond
4.94% AER fixed
On maturity
£5,000 - £5,000,000
91 days
Open via: website, post
Go to site
View details
loading

Why should I use a business savings account?

Business savings accounts tend to offer much better interest rates than business accounts. So if your business has some surplus funds, it could make sense to move them into a business savings account, where your money can generate a better return.

Outside of the interest rate benefits, it’s also a prudent idea to have some savings set aside anyway, in case your business is hit by an unexpected situation, such as a downturn in trading or the need to make emergency repairs to your equipment.

Can I use a personal savings account instead?

No, not if it involves business finances. If you want to save a chunk of your business revenue then you’ll need to do it in a business savings account. It’s a similar situation to being legally required to have a business current account if you’re using banking services as a limited company, so that your personal and commercial funds are kept separate.

The only possible exception to this is if you operate as a sole trader or a freelancer. If your banking provider allows it, you could already be using your personal current account to make and receive business payments on a small scale. So you could in theory use a personal savings account to set aside and grow some of your earnings. (But as a sole trader, you can open a business savings account if you’d like to.)

What types of business savings accounts are available?

Similar to personal savings accounts, there are a couple of different options when choosing which business savings account to open. These include:

  • Easy access. These accounts tend to offer the least competitive interest rates in exchange for being able to instantly access funds if you need to withdraw them.
  • Notice accounts. You’ll have limited access to this account and will need to provide a set amount of notice (potentially a couple of months) if you need to make a withdrawal.
  • Fixed term. This type of account usually offers the best interest rate but you’ll need to keep your funds locked in for the duration of the fixed term.

How to choose a business savings account

You’ll need to do your research before selecting a business savings account, so here are some pointers to consider:

  • Access. Do you need to have instant access to your savings or are you happy to leave them untouched in an account for a long period of time? This will influence whether you go for an easy access, notice or fixed term account.
  • Interest rate. Obviously an important factor if you’re looking for a return on your savings. Check out which provider is offering the best rates – but remember the type of account you choose (e.g. easy access vs fixed term) will also influence how competitive the rate is.
  • Bonuses. Some accounts will have introductory offers when opening a new account, or bonuses for leaving your money in the account for an extended period of time. Remember, you might have to keep an eye on when bonus offers end and switch to a better account.
  • Minimum balance. There’s usually a minimum balance required to open and then maintain an account, which you are not allowed to fall below. Make sure you’re confident you can meet this savings threshold.
  • Your type of business. Although business savings accounts in general are available to all types of businesses, there might be specific account products on offer for sole traders, limited companies or certain sectors, such as charities.

Are business savings accounts covered by the FSCS?

The Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS) protects deposits of up to £85,000 that you have with any licensed banking provider. So if your business account is with a licensed UK bank, then it will be covered by the FSCS.

Tax on business savings accounts

There will be tax payable on the interest earned by money in your business savings account, as this interest is usually paid gross (with no tax deducted) by your banking provider.

If you’re a sole trader the interest will form part of your income, and that will be subject to your personal tax allowance, which is used when calculating your annual self-assessment tax return.

Limited companies pay corporation tax, so any business savings interest will need to be included for tax purposes in your profit calculations.

Pros and cons of business savings accounts

Pros

  • If you’re a limited company you’ll need to open one if you want to save some of your business revenue into a bank account.
  • You can get a return on your money with better interest rates than a business current account.
  • There’s a range of accounts to choose from varying from easy access to fixed term.
  • You can set money aside for any unexpected event affecting your business.

Cons

  • You’ll need to pay tax on any interest.
  • If you choose a fixed term account but unexpectedly have to withdraw the money then you’ll face a penalty fee.

Bottom line

If your business is in the fortunate position to have some surplus funds that can be held in reserve, it may be a good idea to place it in a business savings account. This is because these savings accounts tend to offer better interest rates than business current accounts.

Placing this cash in a business savings account can be a great place to allow your firm’s money to grow while being kept for any unforeseen costs.

If you’re confident that your firm won’t need the money in the near future, you may benefit from a placing the cash in a fixed-term notice account. These accounts offer a higher rate of interest, but you won’t be able to touch that money without incurring penalties during the fixed term.

Finally, the key thing to bear in mind with using a business savings account is that your business will most likely need to pay tax on any interest earned.

Ready to compare accounts?

Get started

Frequently asked questions

We show offers we can track - that's not every product on the market...yet. Unless we've said otherwise, products are in no particular order. The terms "best", "top", "cheap" (and variations of these) aren't ratings, though we always explain what's great about a product when we highlight it. This is subject to our terms of use. When you make major financial decisions, consider getting independent financial advice. Always consider your own circumstances when you compare products so you get what's right for you. Most of the data in Finder's comparison tables has the source: Moneyfacts Group PLC. In other cases, Finder has sourced data directly from providers.

More guides on Finder

Go to site