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Credit card limit calculator

Learn what factors go into deciding your credit card limit.

There is no definite way to determine what your credit limit might be, as card providers often follow their own unique policies when deciding your credit limit. Because of that, take any information you get from online credit limit calculators with a grain of salt.

What you can do, however, is learn how certain factors determine your credit limit. This can help you make a more accurate estimate.

How can I calculate my potential credit limit?

As mentioned, there is no concrete way to calculate probable credit limit, and the process to arrive at a credit limit can vary from one credit card provider to the next. Here’s what card providers take into account.

  • Credit history. Details in your credit report like repayment history, outstanding debts, and unsuccessful applications for debt can have an impact on your credit limit.
  • Income. Your credit limit, in most instances, stays in direct proportion to your income, where higher income normally translates into higher credit limits. The frequency and reliability of income can also affect your credit limit.
  • The card provider. Credit card providers can offer you different credit limits even though you submit exactly the same information through their applications. If you’ve banked with the provider in the past, a reliable history on your part can lead to a higher than usual credit limit.

How to use an online credit limit calculator

Online credit card limit calculators can give you a vague idea of what your credit limit might look like. Unfortunately, it’s difficult to determine exactly what your credit limit is and you can’t be entirely sure of how your credit card provider will calculate your limit. Think of them as more of a “credit limit estimator.”

If you do end up using an online credit card limit calculator, bear in mind that the result should only work as an indication of what you can look forward to, and don’t expect your card provider to rely on similar parameters. At the end of the day, it’s your card provider who establishes exactly what your credit limit should be.

How to check your credit card limit

If you have an existing credit card and can’t remember your maximum limit, you can simply call your issuer or login to your account online if available. You can also find this information in the documentation you receive when you open your card account. If you’re unsure if this is what you’re credit limit should be, you can call your issuer.

If your credit card limit is not enough for your needs, you can consider requesting a credit limit increase.

Credit cards with a high credit limit

Providers rarely share credit limit ranges for their cards, which makes it hard to make an accurate estimate on what you’ll get. The maximum limits you find online are mostly anecdotal.

Read the full guide on comparing high limit cards by type:

Compare high limit credit cards

Providers rarely share the credit limit ranges for their cards before you apply. If you’re looking for a high credit limit, users have found that the cards below tend to have ones that are higher-than-average.

Name Product Filter values Rewards Purchase APR Annual fee
Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express
6% on select US streaming services, 3% on transit and US gas stations, 6% at US supermarkets on up to $6,000 annually, then 1% after that and on all other purchases (redeem as statement credit)
0% intro for the first 12 months (then 13.99% to 23.99% variable)
$0 intro annual fee for the first year ($95 thereafter)
Earn up to $350. In your first 6 months, you can earn a $150 statement credit when you spend $3,000, and earn 20% back on Amazon purchases made with your card, up to $200 total. Having 6 months to earn a welcome offer is a rare benefit as most cards give you only 3. Terms apply, see rates & fees
Blue Cash Everyday® Card from American Express
3% at US supermarkets on up to $6,000 per year (then 1%), 2% at US gas stations and select US department stores and 1% on all other purchases (redeem as statement credit)
0% intro for the first 15 months (then 13.99% to 23.99% variable)
$0
Earn up to $250. You'll get 20% back on Amazon.com purchases in the first six months for up to $150 back, and $100 after you spend $2,000 in the first six months. This is a higher-than-average welcome offer for a card with no annual fee. Terms apply, see rates & fees
Chase Freedom Unlimited®
5% cash back on travel purchased through Chase, 5% on Lyft, 3% on dining and drugstores and 1.5% on all other purchases
0% intro for the first 15 months (then 14.99% to 23.74% variable)
$0
This solid 1.5% cashback card gets even better with the addition of up to 5% back in categories like travel, drug stores and dining.
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Compare up to 4 providers

What should I be wary of when changing my credit limit?

Increasing your card’s credit limit gives you access to more money. But that may not always be a good thing. Here are the two most common pitfalls.

  • Overspending. An increased credit limit translates into you getting more money to spend, and this could lead to a build-up of debt that you may have issues repaying. The higher the credit limits, the higher the chances of overspending.
  • Interest. The outstanding balance in your account that rolls over from one month to the next attracts interest, and an increased credit limit can work in increasing the outstanding balance, resulting in you paying more in the form of interest. If you don’t pay your account’s balance in full every month, a credit limit increase might not be a good option.

Bottom line

The credit limit your card comes with defines how much you can spend using your card, and while changing a card’s existing limit is possible, it requires several considerations. Some of the factors that can affect your application for a credit limit increase include your income, your creditworthiness, and the card provider in question. While increasing your credit limit may seem like the resolution to your financial problems, there are a number of considerations you should also be wary of before applying for an increase.

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4 Responses

    Default Gravatar
    rajashekarAugust 28, 2017

    my card is block i want to pay it in emi basis and my card total payment 70000/- so please send how much i should pay to every month to release my card

      Avatarfinder Customer Care
      KyleAugust 28, 2017Staff

      Hi Rajashekar,

      We’re sorry to hear that your card has been blocked. Unfortunately, we can’t tell you how much to pay a month to release the card, but we can try to put you on the right path to resolve the issue. It’s best if you contact the lender directly to sort out a monthly payment that will allow you to have a line of credit. If that option is not available, you may be able to save some money by paying off your credit card debt with a personal loan that has a lower interest rate than your current credit card. Here is some more information on personal loans. https://www.finder.com/personal-loans

      I hope you can get this all sorted out!

      Kyle

    Default Gravatar
    GlennJuly 26, 2017

    Fico 770, 200k+ income, home value 333k. Never had a single late pay. Ex-vice president job title for 20+ yrs. 40k average credit. I want a high limit card doing a personal project and withdraw cash amount around 5k a day. What kind of credit card limit and which one should I go for?

      Avatarfinder Customer Care
      HaroldJuly 27, 2017Staff

      Hi Glenn,

      Thank you for your inquiry.

      Generally, you will only know how much your credit limit is when your credit card application gets approved. The card issuer will only approve you for an amount that they think you can reasonably repay and so they will weigh in a few factors including your credit score, income, employment before assigning you your credit limit.

      There are several providers that offer high-credit-limit credit cards that you can compare. If you have an excellent credit score, then you may enjoy a very high limit with these credit cards.

      As a reminder, please ensure that you meet all the eligibility criteria and read through the Product Disclosure Statements/Terms and Conditions before applying to see whether it is right for you.

      I hope this information has helped.

      Cheers,
      Harold

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