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Compare $100,000 jumbo CD rates

Keep your money growing at a competitive rate.

Updated

Fact checked

Our pick for Jumbo CDs: CIT Bank Jumbo CDs

CIT Bank Jumbo CDs logo

0.4%

2-year APY

  • Guaranteed rate of return
  • Balance your overall investments
  • No account opening or maintenance fees
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Jumbo CDs are a safe investment alternative that usually require a minimum $100,000 deposit. But they can have high penalties if you withdraw your money early. Compare jumbo CD rates available today, and see which one is the right account for you.

How do I compare jumbo CDs?

When comparing jumbo CDs, keep the following in mind:

  • Interest rates. The higher your interest rate, the more you’ll earn. And with a $100,000 deposit, even a slight difference in interest can add up to a lot of money.
  • Terms. Consider carefully how long you want to have your balance locked into a savings account. You’ll get a better interest rate if you choose a longer term, which could range anywhere from one month to 10 years or more.
  • Minimum deposits. Most jumbo CDs have minimum deposits of $100,000 or more. Make sure you look for an account that has a minimum deposit that aligns with your needs.
  • Fees. Most jumbo CDs don’t have monthly fees, but you’ll want to look for one with reasonable early withdrawal penalties, so you’re not hit as hard if you need to withdraw funds early.

Compare the jumbo CD rates

Compare jumbo CD rates from top financial institutions. Sort the table by term or click the “Compare” box next to your favorite institutions to view rates side-by-side.

Name Product 1-year APY 18-month APY 2-year APY 3-year APY 5-year APY
CIT Bank Jumbo CDs
0.4%
0.4%
0.5%
Financial Partners Credit Union CD
Financial Partners Credit Union CD
0.75%
0.75%
0.8%
1.05%
1.25%
USAA Jumbo CD
0.7%
0.85%
0.91%
1.23%
USAA Super Jumbo CD
0.7%
0.85%
0.91%
1.02%
1.23%
CIBC CDs
0.65%
0.65%
0.65%
0.65%
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Compare up to 4 providers

What are the pros and cons of a jumbo CD?

Jumbo CDs with high deposit requirements have these pros and cons:

Pros

  • High-interest earnings. A high-balance CD will offer a competitive, fixed interest rate.
  • Incentive. Locking in your savings for a set period of time can help you keep your hands out of the piggy bank.
  • Flexibility. There are a lot of CD options on the market, so you can choose a term length and interest payout option that works best for you.
  • Safe. You can deposit up to $250,000 at a federally insured bank knowing that no matter what happens, you’ll get your money back when your term is up.

Cons

  • Restrictive. If you commit to a term length you aren’t able to follow through with, you could potentially lose some or all of your earned interest — and in certain cases, even a percentage of your principal.
  • Lower rates. This is a non-aggressive method of increasing your wealth. Riskier investments, like stocks or real estate, offer a higher potential for capital gains — along with a higher potential for major losses.

Our top pick: CIT Bank Jumbo CDs

  • Guaranteed rate of return
  • Balance your overall investments
  • No account opening or maintenance fees

Our top pick: CIT Bank Jumbo CDs

  • FDIC insured
  • Balanced investments with dependable return
  • Daily compounding interest to maximize your earning potential

    How does a jumbo CD work?

    A jumbo CD is any certificate of deposit for $100,000 or more that grows your investment at a fixed interest rate over a specified period of time. You’ll know exactly how much you’re getting and when — but there are penalties if you withdraw your money early. Longer terms will be eligible for higher interest rates.

    Bottom line

    If you’re looking for a safe, guaranteed way to grow your income over a set period of time, consider a high-yield CD. But if you can’t commit to not touching your money for the full term length, you may be better off with a traditional savings account or a combination of the two.

    Frequently asked questions

    Picture: Shutterstock

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