Jaja credit card review 2021

Fintech startup Jaja has launched in the UK with its digital credit card, but is not currently accepting applications.

With new digital banking companies launching almost every month, managing your current account from an app is somewhat of a given by now. However, digital-only credit card companies are still comparatively rare. We take a look at what Jaja is planning to offer and whether it’s worth keeping an eye on it.

2.0 ★★★★★ (2 reviews) Write a review
Representative example: When you spend £1,200 at a purchase rate of 18.9% (variable) p.a., your representative rate is 18.9% APR (variable).

£0

Account fee

Up to 56 days

Interest-free each billing period

£250

Minimum credit limit

Details

NetworkVisa
Annual/monthly fees£0
Purchases18.9% - 34.9%
Purchases interest-free periodUp to 56 days
Money transfers13.9% - 29.9%
Cash advances18.9%
Min credit limit£250
Max credit limitSubject to status: £20,000
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Review by


Valentina Cipriani is a writer at Finder UK. She writes news, features and guides about banking and credit cards, helping people to improve their financial lives. She holds an MA in International Journalism and loves taking complicated topics apart and giving them back to the readers in a clear and easy fashion.

Expert review

Jaja’s journey has been a bit of a saga. For a long time, its card was in beta, and the bizarrely named new brand was making bold claims about shaking up the credit card market.

With a card boasting few fees, competitive interest rates on various types of transaction and a slick app experience, Jaja looked set to join the ranks of Monzo, Starling and Zopa, in disrupting the banking status quo.

Fast-forward a couple of years and Jaja is as enigmatic as ever. You can’t currently apply for a Jaja card, but the company has taken over the Bank of Ireland’s credit cards arm (including Post Office and AA cards opened prior to the acquisition), acquiring a large volume of unwitting new customers in the process.

It’s difficult to see why you’d be desperate to get your hands on a Jaja credit card right now. Perks and rewards are a weak spot – with cashback offers only awarded to the first 5,000 people who signed up, and now gone. If you like to treat yourself with the extras that many cards offer nowadays, Jaja probably won’t cut it for you.

You also can’t register your card for Google Pay or Apple Pay, which is a bit of a shocker for a brand that seems to be targeting a younger demographic.

It also remains to be seen whether Jaja will actually deliver, and how it will look in six months from now. Like with most new fintech companies, the initial offer will probably (make that hopefully) evolve and change quite a lot.

What is Jaja?

Founded by three Norwegian entrepreneurs, Jaja is a credit card “built for the digital world”. You do get a physical card, but it’s all about quickly applying online and then managing the card directly from the app.

In 2019, Jaja announced a partnership with Bank of Ireland, and acquired its existing credit card portfolio. This means that all Bank of Ireland, the AA, and Post Office-branded credit cards have now been moved over to the Jaja system.

At the end of 2018 it launched a crowdfunding on platform Seedrs, through which it raised almost £5 million.

What benefits can I get with a Jaja credit card?

  • A Visa card. Jaja credit cards are issued on the Visa network, which means they are accepted pretty much anywhere with 20 million locations worldwide.
  • A mobile app. You can manage your card online, get instant notifications when you use it and tag your spendings to make budgeting easier and smarter.
  • Fee-free spending abroad. Jaja won’t charge any fees if you use the card outside the UK.

How much does Jaja cost?

Jaja is advertised as a fee-free credit card, and looking at its specs, it looks like it’s (almost) true:

  • There’s no annual fee.
  • You won’t be charged for using the card abroad, nor for withdrawing cash. But do keep in mind that the interest-free period doesn’t apply to cash withdrawals, so it’s still a bad idea to use the card at ATMs.
  • There’s a £12 late payment fee.

Other key features will include an up-to-56-days-long interest-free period if you pay off your bill on time every month and an 18.9% APR (Average Percentage Rate). Depending on your personal situation, you can get between £250 and £20,000 of credit.

Applying for a Jaja credit card

Jaja is currently not accepting new applications, but if you’re an existing Post Office Money credit card customer, you can now register your card with Jaja via its website.

Once applications are open, Jaja says the online application process should only take a few minutes – you’ll only need to scan your passport or driving licence, and it will let you know instantly whether you’ve been accepted.

However, as with most credit cards, when you apply Jaja will be running a credit check and a refusal could impact your credit score.

Jaja customer reviews

Jaja has received negative reviews from customers, according to customer review sites like TrustPilot. It currently has a TrustPilot rating of 1.1 out of 5, based on over 700 reviews (updated 23 December 2020). Many customers complained of issues since their existing Post Office Money accounts were moved over to Jaja, including poor customer service and communication, and incorrect payments.

The Jaja credit card app also has poor customer reviews (updated 23 December 2020), with a score of 1.8 out of 5 on the Google Play store (based on over 600 reviews), and a rating of 1.5 out of 5 on the Apple App Store (based on over 800 reviews).

The verdict

On first impressions, Jaja looked set to join the likes of Zopa in modernising the humble credit card by adding the type of digital-focused features we’ve all come to expect from our bank accounts.

However, the proof is in the pudding. And while Jaja talked a big game, it then pivoted to simply buying customers off other banks – instead of earning them by marketing an innovative product. What’s more, many of these acquired customers have expressed confusion and discontent.

It remains to be seen if Jaja can deliver a viable, user-friendly service. Time will tell.

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