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Compare pet insurance for working dogs

Your pup’s occupation may weigh into the type of coverage they need.

Updated

Swimming service dog

You can find pet insurance for a working or service dog, although not every insurance company covers them. Depending on the dangers involved with your pup’s work, you might consider extra coverage for injuries, liability or routine care. On the other hand, service dogs who perform low-risk tasks may need standard coverage.

Can working dogs get pet insurance?

Yes, most working dogs can get pet insurance. However, some insurance companies exclude coverage for pets with an occupation or for injuries related to that occupation. If you want to buy a policy, look for companies who will include working dogs.

You can contact customer service to find out its policy before buying insurance. A few companies may allow coverage if you declare your pet’s occupation ahead of time.

What coverage do working dogs need?

Because your canine acts as both a friend and a working buddy, yours may need wider coverage than the average pup. Coverage to consider:

  • Accident and illness. Look for plenty of coverage to protect your pup’s working situation, especially if they’re at high risk for an accident. But consider illness coverage to keep your dog in champion shape so they don’t miss working days.
  • Routine care. If you like staying on top of preventive care, a routine care policy could roll those costs into a monthly bill. Consider if you’ll use most of the benefits offered.
  • Pet liability. You may need coverage for injuries or damage your dog causes to other people and their property. But since the damage would be work-related, you could check if your employer’s business insurance covers this risk first.
  • Breeding and pregnancy. You could find this helpful if you plan to preserve your dog’s pedigree or if your dog works as a breeding dog.
  • Lost pet. This optional coverage can help you recover your dog after getting lost. Some policies also reimburse you for your dog’s value.

Compare pet insurance for working dogs.

Name Product Pets covered Seniors accepted Hereditary conditions Chronic illness
Petplan
Dogs, Cats
Cover unexpected vet bills from emergency exams, injuries, surgery and more.
Embrace
Dogs, Cats
Enjoy extra benefits with coverage for exam fees, curable conditions and wellness visit reimbursement.
Pet Assure
Dogs, Cats, Horses
Save up to 25% on all vet bills including wellness and dental visits for as little as $10/month.
PetFirst
Dogs, Cats
Get coverage starting at $9 per month for cats and $15 for dogs. Talk to an agent at 888-738-0683.
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Pet insurance for by service dog occupation

Your canine friend can endure many injuries or illnesses while working beside you in the trenches. The dangers — and the protection needed — vary based on your dog’s occupation.

Service dogs

A service dog is any dog trained to perform tasks that help with a person’s disabilities. These dogs may help their owners identify important sounds, navigate or balance while walking, remind them to take medicine or even help during medical emergencies.

These dogs may benefit from accident coverage in case they suffer injuries while trying to help their owners. For example, a dog might suffer a leg injury while looking for someone to help with a medical emergency. Illness and wellness coverage can also keep these dogs in good health. Despite the wide coverage, you can cover your service dog’s insurance costs in creative ways to make them more affordable.

Guide dogs

A guide dog is a service dog that helps people with hearing or sight impairments. These dogs may help people navigate while walking around or draw attention to important sounds. The main risk for these dogs may involve injuries from other people or traffic on crowded streets. Guide dogs can also benefit from wellness or illness coverage to keep them in top condition for their work.

Emotional support dogs

Emotional support dogs are officially certified to provide comfort for their owners’ emotional needs. Because these dogs don’t perform special tasks, they may need standard pet insurance.

Herding and hunting dogs

Herding dogs help their owners drive a group of animals like cattle or sheep. They may round up the animals for vet checkups, feedings or transporting to another owner or location.

Hunting dogs may help their owners track quarry and dig for animals that burrow underground. They may also alert their owners when game is near.

Both herding and hunting dogs can suffer animal bites, cuts, fractures or broken bones, parasite infections and illnesses from working around other animals. An accident and illness policy can serve these active pups well, and wellness coverage can keep them in superior shape.

Police dogs

Police dogs support law enforcement work by tracking down specific scents or assisting with a police chase. These dogs face a variety of injuries from strained muscles and joints, cuts, fractures or broken bones and gunshot wounds. These hazards may be covered under business insurance for the police station. If not, a few companies offer coverage for these working dogs.

How much is pet insurance for working dogs?

You might pay anywhere from $30 to $50 per month to insure many breeds used for work, such as Golden Retrievers or German Shepherds. However, some companies may charge extra for certain pup occupations.

A few other factors that may affect your dog’s premium:

  • Your dog’s size
  • Breed, especially purebreds and those with hereditary conditions
  • Cost of vet care at your location
  • Type of work your dog performs

Bottom line

Working dogs can face a variety of accidents and injuries while performing special tasks for their owners. To make sure your dog serves you for a long time, consider which pet insurance gives the best protection for their needs.

Questions about pet insurance for working dogs

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