Home Authors Matt Miczulski
Matt Miczulski

Matt Miczulski

Writer

Matt Miczulski is a personal finance writer at Finder, where he digs into mortgages and refinancing to help Americans get closer to their dream of homeownership. His passion for empowering people to take control of their finances grew from his own experience of paying off $30,000 in debt in a little more than a year. His expertise and writing have been featured on CBS, MSN, Best Company and Consolidated Credit, among others. Before joining Finder, Matt covered everything from finance news and banking, to debt and travel for FinanceBuzz. He’s also a proud military veteran, completing one tour in Iraq and earning a BA in history along the way.

Expertise

  • Paying off debt
  • Credit cards
  • Budgeting and saving
  • Banking
  • Mortgages and refinancing

Highlights

  • Well-versed in breaking down financial jargon and complex topics to meet readers where they are in their financial journey
  • Featured on Best Company, Consolidated Credit, MSN, CBS and MediaFeed, among others
  • Author of over 185 articles on budgeting and saving, paying off debt, mortgages, credit cards and more
  • Paid off $30,000 in debt in a little more than a year

Education

  • Bachelor of Arts in history | William Paterson University | 2012–2014
  • Associate of Arts in liberal Arts | Warren County Community College | 2009–2011

Featured Publications

Industry insights from Matt Miczulski

We asked Matt to demonstrate his expertise by answering a few questions about mortgages and personal finance.

What advice do you have for others struggling to pay off massive amounts of debt, based on what you learned from your family’s own journey to becoming debt free?

Don’t try to tackle your debt without both a plan and an accurate assessment of your finances. Start off by listing your total debts, as well as your monthly income and expenses. Having a concrete goal to aim for will allow you to put an effective spending plan in place. Other than that, debt repayment takes time. You’ll get frustrated, and it will sometimes feel like you’re not getting anywhere. But don’t worry: This is completely normal. Stay disciplined and persistent with your repayments and you’ll start making headway. To keep you on the right path, find ways to stay motivated. Your headspace going into this is just as important as having the money to repay the debt — and nothing can derail a debt repayment strategy faster than a lack of motivation. If it means treating yourself every once in a while so that you stay on track, do it. Debt repayment isn’t fun, but the outcome is totally worth it.

With post-COVID mortgage rates low, should homebuyers consider a fixed-rate mortgage instead of an adjustable-rate mortgage?

Though they’re always fluctuating, the average interest rates for the 30-year fixed, 15-year fixed and 5/1 adjustable-rate mortgages are at some of the lowest they’ve been in years if you look at mortgage rate history. But we’ll probably start to see mortgage and refinance rates increase as the economy begins to get its footing again. Because rates are still hovering at record low levels, a fixed-rate mortgage is the clear winner for most borrowers right now.

Are credit cards with high annual fees ever worth it?

Credit cards with high annual fees usually come with numerous benefits that help offset a portion of the fee, such as a sign-up bonus and various statement credits. But since the sign-up bonus is a one-time deal, you really need to look at the second year to determine the card’s ongoing value. Without the sign-up bonus, are the card’s annual credits, perks and spending category multipliers enough to justify the high annual fee? Will you actually use the $200 Uber credit or $100 Saks Fifth Avenue credit or whatever credits the card offers? The card might offer 5X points on travel, but what if you don’t plan to travel much for the foreseeable future? These are the things to consider when trying to determine if a credit card with a high annual fee is worth it to you. In short, yes, credit cards with high annual fees can be worth it. It just depends on how the card aligns with your spending habits.

Latest articles by Matt Miczulski

8 articles written by this author

How an overdraft affect your mortgage application

Though unlikely, it’s possible that an overdraft on your bank account could affect your mortgage application.

Matt Miczulski 16 July 2021
How an overdraft affect your mortgage application

Investors Bank mortgage review

An East-Coast-based traditional lender with plenty of mortgage options but an inefficient application process.

Matt Miczulski 2 July 2021
Investors Bank mortgage review

Delta Community Credit Union mortgage review

A mortgage with the first-time homebuyer in mind, though experienced homebuyers should find plenty of options.

Matt Miczulski 2 July 2021
Delta Community Credit Union mortgage review

Provident Funding mortgage review

Purchase a new home or refinance an existing mortgage with decent rates, but expect to pay some fees.

Matt Miczulski 1 July 2021
Provident Funding mortgage review

First Home Mortgage review

Numerous mortgage options, but only for homebuyers in select states.

Matt Miczulski 1 July 2021
First Home Mortgage review

Morty mortgage review

Preapproval in minutes and closing in as little as 3 weeks with no origination fees, saving you time and money as you buy your next home.

Matt Miczulski 25 June 2021
Morty mortgage review

HomeStreet Bank mortgage review

Purchase a home or remodel your existing home with modest fees, but mortgages aren’t available in every state.

Matt Miczulski 5 June 2021
HomeStreet Bank mortgage review

HomeLight mortgage review

A mortgage that saves you time and money and better positions you as a buyer.

Matt Miczulski 3 June 2021
HomeLight mortgage review
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