Advantages and disadvantages of whole life insurance

The pros and cons of having an insurance policy and investment product rolled into one.

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The main purpose of life insurance is to provide for your loved ones when you die. Whole life insurance does that, and also becomes a cash asset over time. But it might be years before you’ll be able to make the most of its living benefits.

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Advantages of whole life insurance

These are the main perks of taking out a whole life insurance policy:

  • It provides lifelong protection. Unlike term life, whole life insurance lasts a lifetime.
  • It accumulates cash value. Whenever you pay a premium, part of it goes toward the cash value portion of your policy — which grows on a tax-deferred basis. Once you’ve built up enough cash value, you can borrow against your policy. The interest rates are typically low, and you won’t be taxed. In this way, whole life insurance functions as an emergency savings account.
  • It has a minimum rate of return. Even if the market dips, the cash value of your policy will still earn the guaranteed interest rate set by your insurer. Since it’s not subject to the ups and downs of the market, whole life insurance can be a solid investment.
  • It offers a financial safety net for you and your beneficiaries. During your lifetime, you can take advantage of ‘living benefits,’ such as the ability to take out tax-free loans against your policy to pay for large expenses or fund your retirement. And when you die, your beneficiaries will receive a guaranteed death benefit.
  • It has predictable premiums. With whole life, the premiums stay the same, so you know exactly how much you’ll pay each month.
  • It has the potential to earn dividends. If you’re with a mutual life insurance company, you might earn dividends based on their profits. You can then cash in the money, use it to pay your premiums or boost the cash value of your policy.
  • It can unlock a range of riders. Depending on your provider, you might be able to dress up your policy with a longer list of riders, such as a term and long-term care rider.
  • It can help with estate planning. If you’ve built up a large estate, you can use a whole life insurance policy to set up a trust — and leave your heirs the funds they need to pay estate taxes. The IRS doesn’t consider death benefits as taxable income. So generally, this money isn’t taxed. Likewise, if you have a child with special needs, a whole life policy can also fund a special needs trust to pay for your child’s care when you’re gone.
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Disadvantages of whole life insurance

Like all insurance products, whole life insurance has its downsides:

  • It’s expensive. Since permanent policies offer lifelong coverage, they come with a significantly higher price tag. Whole life typically costs 5 to 10 times more than term life insurance.
  • It’s not as flexible as other permanent policies. You can’t increase or decrease your coverage if your circumstances change. You can’t adjust your premiums, either. If you foresee income fluctuations, you might want to explore a universal life insurance policy.
  • It can take a long time to build cash value. In the first few years, most of your premium pays for the insurer’s fees and commissions, and a small percentage goes toward your cash value. This means it might take 10 to 15 years to accumulate the cash value you need to start taking out loans against your policy.
  • Its loans are subject to interest. If you decide to borrow against your policy, your insurer will charge you interest. And if you don’t pay it back before you die, they’ll reduce the death benefit and your beneficiaries will receive less money.
  • It’s not always the best investment choice. Depending on the market, the interest you earn on the cash value might be less than what you could get with other investments.

Myths about whole life insurance

These are some of the most common myths about whole life insurance.

  • It’s a great way to diversify your investment portfolio. While whole life insurance has an investment component — the cash value — it’s primarily a life insurance product. Each insurer sets a minimum rate of return on the cash value, which typically floats between 2% and 2.5%. If aggressive investing is your goal, you may want to look into other investment vehicles.
  • It’s perfect for retirement planning. Sure, you can dip into the cash value portion of your whole life policy to fund your retirement. But it shouldn’t be your only source of cash. To plan for a comfortable retirement, it’s a good idea to funnel more of your savings into your 401(k) and IRA accounts.
  • It only pays out when the policyholder dies. With many providers, you can opt into riders that will let you withdraw money from your policy in certain situations. For example, if you’re diagnosed with a terminal illness, an accelerated death benefit rider allows you to cash in part or all of your policy to pay for your medical expenses. Similarly, a chronic illness rider steps in if you develop a serious health condition. When you die, your insurer will deduct any withdrawals you made from the death benefit.
  • The beneficiary receives the death benefit, plus the policy’s cash value. This is where whole life insurance gets complicated. Most insurers have a use-it-or-lose-it attitude toward cash value. If you don’t withdraw it during your lifetime, it goes back to the insurer when you die. That said, some insurers offer a death benefit along with an added cash value benefit.
  • The premiums will rise as you get older. When you purchase a whole life policy, your premium is locked in for life. This means you’ll pay the same amount every month, even if your health starts to decline. To score the best possible premium, you’ll want to apply for coverage as soon as you know you need it. Insurers reserve their top rates for young, healthy applicants.
  • You can’t borrow against your whole life policy. Once you’ve accumulated enough cash value, you can borrow against your policy. You can use that money for any reason, and you won’t be penalized for withdrawing it before a certain age like you would with a 401(k). But remember that if you die before you’ve paid back the money, your insurance company will reduce the death benefit.

Compare life insurance companies

Name Product Issue Ages Coverage Range Medical Exam Required State Availability
18 - 85 years old
$10,000 to $10,000,000+
Depends on provider and policy
All 50 states
Compare affordable quotes from 12+ A-rated life insurance companies side-by-side.
AIG
20 - 85 years old
$100,000 to $2,000,000
Depends on policy.
Products and product features may not be available in all states.
This well-established life insurance provider could offer you $250,000 worth of coverage for as low as $14 per month.
21 - 54 years old
$50,000 to $1,000,000
No
Not available in Alaska or New York
Affordable 2-, 10- and 20-year term life insurance policies. Instant quotes and no medical exams.
20 - 60 years old
$100,000 to $8,000,000
No
Not available in New York
Term life insurance with no policy fees and the freedom to cancel anytime. Simple application process that can get you approved for coverage instantly.
18 - 64 years old
$100,000 to $3,000,000
No
All 50 states
Customized term life insurance policies up to $3 million, no medical exam for certain applicants.

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Bottom line

Whole life insurance offers permanent protection, plus the opportunity to invest. It’s ideal for people who want to turn their policy into a cash asset and those who want to use it for estate planning purposes. However, whole life insurance is expensive and it can take a long time to build cash value — and start taking advantage of the ‘living benefits.’

Compare whole life insurance providers if you think this policy might be right for you.

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