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Post Office mortgage calculator

Discover how the Post Office mortgage calculators can help you work out the cost of your mortgage.

The Post Office has teamed up with Bank of Ireland UK to offer mortgages for UK homeowners in a range of scenarios.

Its website also has a couple of online calculators to help you work out how much you can potentially borrow, and the size of your monthly mortgage repayments.

Below, we explain how to use these helpful tools.

More mortgage calculators

How much can I borrow?

Estimate the size of mortgage that will be available to you based on factors like your income and deposit.

How much will it cost?

Estimate your monthly repayments in seconds from your mortgage amount, interest rate and duration.

How much stamp duty will I pay?

Buying a property over £125,000? Calculate how much you will pay in stamp duty with our handy calculator.

Affordability calculator

This calculator will help you estimate how much the Post Office could lend you based on your circumstances.

You begin by entering the annual income for each applicant, then the amount you have to put towards a deposit. Finally, enter your mortgage term and your monthly outgoings.

You’ll then see an estimate of how much the Post Office could lend you. This isn’t a mortgage offer and is not legally binding. You’ll need to go through the full application process to discover the amount you could borrow. It’ll be based on a more detailed breakdown of your income and outgoings.

The calculator also has an option for those who want to buy a property with financial assistance from their family. You’ll enter the same information, confirm whether your assistor has paid off their property (they’ll need to have done so to be eligible), then enter the same financial information for your assistor.

Repayment calculator

This tool will estimate what your monthly repayments will be with a Post Office mortgage. Enter how much you’d like to borrow, then select your Post Office mortgage, your chosen term and repayment method (capital and interest or interest-only).

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