Compare sport bike insurance

Designed for speed and agility, these high-performance bikes can be expensive to cover.

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Finding affordable coverage for your sport bikes can be tough, with the highest theft rate and a high rate of injury, insurers could shy away from covering supersport bikes.

What kind of sport bike coverage do I need?

Unless you live in Florida, New Hampshire, Montana or Washington, you’ll need motorcycle insurance for your sport bike. The most common types of coverage include:

  • Liability. Covers damage you cause to another person’s property or injury to that person.
  • Collision. Covers damage to your bike caused by a crash.
  • Comprehensive. This covers damage to your bike that results from something other than a collision, like fire, theft or vandalism.
  • Uninsured/underinsured. You’re covered after an accident with a driver or rider who doesn’t have enough insurance to cover the damages.
  • Medical payments. Coverage for medical bills after an accident while riding your bike.

What sport bike add-on coverage should I consider?

Beyond the standard types of coverage, you might want to consider additional protection for your sport bike.

  • Enhanced injury protection. Because riding a sport bike can be dangerous, extra protection for injuries that cause you to be unable to work might be beneficial.
  • Total loss coverage. With this coverage, you’ll be reimbursed for your bike’s full MSRP. Without it, you’ll only get the actual cash value of your bike, after depreciation.
  • Accessories and custom parts. If your bike is customized and tricked out with accessories, this will make sure you’re covered.
  • Original Equipment Manufacturer parts. Only OEM parts will be used when you purchase this coverage.
  • Roadside assistance. Get a tow or winch if you’re stuck on the side of the road.
  • Carried contents. Make sure anything you carry on your bike is protected.

How much is sport bike insurance?

Sport bikes are one of the most expensive types of motorcycles to insure, due in part to their high-speed performance and likelihood of being stolen. A bike with higher ccs will push the cost of insurance up significantly.

Consider a Suzuki Hayabusa with 1,340 ccs. Insuring this bike with only liability coverage can run you $1,850 annually. A Honda CBR250R (250 cc’s) with full coverage will cost around $950 annually, and only $216 annually for liability only.

Compare sport bike insurance

Name Product Roadside assistance Accident forgiveness Available states
Optional
Yes (earned after 3 years with no accidents and 4 years of loyalty)
All 50 states
Get protection for any kind of bike with this big-name provider. Enjoy discounts galore plus cheap rates and free perks designed for bikers.
Optional
Yes
All 50 states
This well-advertised insurer lives up to its reputation with discounts, low rates and no-fuss coverage for bikes.
Optional
No
All 50 states
Get add-ons to cover bike replacement and accessories and get rewarded for safe riding.
Included free
Yes
All 50 states
Choose the most comprehensive coverage for your bike and save up to 50% with Allstate's discounts.

Compare up to 4 providers

Do different kinds of sport bikes have different insurance requirements?

No matter which class your sport bike falls into, the requirements for insuring it are the same. Sport bikes generally fall into four classes, categorized by their engine power, measured in ccs:

  • Lightweight. Up to 500 ccs
  • Middleweight. Up to 750 ccs
  • Superbike. Up to 1,000 ccs
  • Hyperbike. 1,000 ccs and up.

If you use your bike for racing, look to a provider that offers specialty insurance. Most policies won’t cover track-day coverage. Specialty insurers can cover things like a collision, and include storage and trailer transport.

How can I get cheap sport bike insurance?

To help save money on your sport bike insurance, look for these ways to save:

  • Safety course. Earn a discount for completing an approved motorcycle rider safety course.
  • Stolen vehicle recovery system. Many providers will give you a discount for installing a recovery system like LoJack, for example.
  • Motorcycle endorsement. If you already have a driver’s license, adding a motorcycle endorsement could earn you a discount. It’s also required in many states. You can get this endorsement by passing a DMV-approved rider course.
  • Rider membership. Members of select motorcycle organizations can get a discount on their insurance, depending on the provider.

How do I get sport bike insurance?

Many providers allow you to get a quote, sign up and purchase a policy all online. If you need track-day insurance for racing your bike as well as traditional coverage, you’ll likely have to contact a specialty insurance provider over the phone or in person.

Be prepared by having the following information ready when purchasing insurance:

  • Bike make, model, year, ccs and VIN
  • Contact info
  • Years of motorcycle driving experience
  • Driver’s license number

What should I watch out for?

You may need to find a provider that offers coverage for these add-ons:

  • Street racing. Although it can sometimes be hard to prove, many policies will exclude any damage resulting from street racing.
  • Organized racing events. Make sure your policy includes coverage you might sustain on the track.
  • Custom parts and accessories. Add-ons like specialty clothing and helmets usually need additional coverage.

Bottom line

If you use your sport bike for racing you might have to look for specialty insurance, and coverage can get expensive. Comparing all of your options will help you get the best deal possible.

Frequently asked questions about sport bike insurance

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