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How to buy British Airways shares | N/Ap

Invest in British Airways by buying International Consolidated Airlines stock in just a few minutes.

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Airlines have been severely affected by the coronavirus pandemic, and this has had a big affect on the share price of many airlines, including British Airways. Those looking to invest in British Airways will need to buy IAG shares, which is the parent company of British Airways, Aer Lingus and Iberia.

British Airways (BA) is part of the International Consolidated Airlines Group, S.A. (LON: IAG) and the flag carrier airline of the UK.

How to buy stock in British Airways

  1. Compare share trading platforms. To buy shares in Ireland you’ll need to find a trading platform that offers access to international stock markets. If you’re just starting out, look for a platform with low brokerage and foreign exchange fees.
  2. Open and fund your brokerage account. Complete an application with your personal and financial details, including your ID. Fund your account with a bank transfer, credit card or debit card.
  3. Search for British Airways (International Consolidated Airlines). Find the share by name or ticker symbol: IAG. Research its history to confirm it's a solid investment against your financial goals.
  4. Purchase now or later. Buy today with a market order or use a limit order to delay your purchase until British Airways (International Consolidated Airlines) reaches your desired price. To spread out your risk, look into dollar-cost averaging, which smooths out buying at consistent intervals and amounts.
  5. Decide on how many to buy. At today's price of N/Ap, weigh your budget against a diversified portfolio that can minimise risk through the market's ups and downs. You may be able to buy a fractional share of International Consolidated Airlines, depending on your broker.
  6. Check in on your investment. Congratulations, you own a part of British Airways (International Consolidated Airlines). Optimise your portfolio by tracking how your stock — and even the business — performs with an eye on the long term. You may be eligible for dividends and shareholder voting rights on directors and management that can affect your stock.
Information last updated 2021-01-23.
OpenN/ApPrevious closeN/Ap
HighN/ApChangeN/Ap
LowN/ApChange %N/A%
CloseN/ApTimestamp1970-01-01
VolumeN/AGMT offsetN/A
IndustryAirlinesCurrency symbolp
CodeIAGCountry nameUK
TypeCommon StockCountry ISOUK
NameInternational Consolidated Airlines Group, S.AISINES0177542018
ExchangeLSECUSIPN/A
Currency codeGBXSectorIndustrials
Currency namePence sterlingFull-time employees61639

British Airways (International Consolidated Airlines) share price

Use our graph to track the performance of IAG stocks over time.

British Airways stock overview

British Airways is the UK's flag carrier airline and has been in operation since 1974. It was formed following the merger of British Overseas Airways Corporation and British European Airways. In January 2011, British Airways and Iberia signed an agreement to become IAG, and the new holding company began trading on the London Stock Exchange (LSE: IAG) and Madrid Stock Exchange (BMAD: IAG) the same month. IAG is also part of the FTSE 100 Index on the London Stock Exchange.

Is now a good time to invest in British Airways?

The IAG share price has tumbled in recent weeks as a result of the impact the coronavirus pandemic has had on air travel. According to investing publications like the Motley Fool, it may be a good time to buy IAG shares as the company believes it is well-placed to weather the ongoing economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic. IAG will be grounding at least 75% of its fleet and furloughing around 35,000 staff in order to cut expenditure. According to the Motley Fool, it should have enough liquidity to survive months of potential shutdown. Investors that believe the company will survive the ongoing crisis may see the current IAG share price as potentially undervalued, and therefore a good time to invest in IAG stock.

Where can I buy British Airways stocks?

If you want to invest in British Airways through it's parent company IAG, you can buy its shares on the following exchanges:
Region Stock Exchange Stock code
UK London Stock Exchange LSE: AIG
Europe Madrid Stock Exchange (Bolsa de Madrid) BMAD: AIG

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