Finder is committed to editorial independence. While we receive compensation when you click links to partners, they do not influence our opinions or reviews. Learn how we make money.

Can you close a credit card with a balance?

Yes, but you’re still on the hook for repayment.

Posted

Fact checked

Is it possible to close a credit card with a balance?

Yes. You can close your credit card at any time, even if you still have a balance. But closing your card doesn’t make your balance disappear. You’re still liable for the outstanding balance and you’ll receive a notification from your bank requesting payment.

Your remaining balance will still accrue interest based on your card terms. You’ll want to pay this off as soon as possible — ideally before you close the card.

Issuers that allow closures despite a balance

Here are the phone numbers you can call to close your account. Bear in mind that wait times can be longer than usual as a result of the ongoing pandemic.

IssuerCan I close cards with a balance?Contact number to close your card
Bank of Americacheckmark800-732-9194
American Expresscheckmark800-528-4800
Capital Onecheckmark800-227-4825
Chasecheckmark800-432-3117
Citicheckmark800-950-5114

How to close a credit card with a balance

Closing a card with a balance isn’t terribly different from closing a card without a balance. This process may slightly vary from provider to provider, but here’s how to close your card:

  1. Call the number on the back of your credit card.
  2. Get in touch with a representative and let them know you want to close your card account.
  3. Confirm your personal information, including your name, phone number and address.
  4. The representative should guide you through the rest of the process. It’s here that you’ll likely discuss the matter of payment.

Will closing a credit card impact my credit score?

Yes, you can expect your credit score to take a small hit after closing your account. This is because closing a card account negatively impacts your credit utilization ratio and your credit history — two factors used to calculate your credit score. That’s why it’s often more beneficial to simply leave a card account open, even if you’re not using it.

If you don’t want to risk using or losing the card, or if the card has an annual fee, you might consider closing it.

Compare balance transfer cards

If you want to close your credit card account but you still have a balance, consider applying for a balance transfer card. A balance transfer card can let you move your old debt onto a new account with an interest-free period. This will let you repay your debt over time without worrying about interest.

Select your credit score and click Show cards to browse a few of your balance transfer options.

%
Name Product Amount saved Balance transfer APR Balance transfer fee Recommended minimum credit score Filter values
Citi® Diamond Preferred® Card
0% intro for the first 18 months (then 14.74% to 24.74% variable)
$5 or 3% of the transaction, whichever is greater
740
An impressive 18 months intro APR on balance transfers and purchases, as well as no annual fee make this one of the top 0% APR cards available.
Citi® Double Cash Card
0% intro for the first 18 months (then 13.99% to 23.99% variable)
$5 or 3% of the transaction, whichever is greater
740
Get a strong 18 month 0% intro APR on balance transfers AND up to 2% back. This is a rare card that offers both rewards and balance transfers.
Luxury Card Mastercard® Titanium Card™
0% intro for the first 15 billing cycles (then 14.99% variable)
$5 or 3% of the transaction, whichever is greater
700
Enjoy unique excursions, privileged access to exclusive events and insider opportunities.
TD Cash Credit Card
0% intro for the first 15 billing cycles (then 12.99%, 17.99% or 22.99% variable)
$5 or 3% of the transaction, whichever is greater
680
3% on dining and 2% on groceries make this a valuable card for food purchases. Use it while traveling, too, with no foreign transaction fees. Available in: CT, DC, DE, FL, MA, MD, ME, NC, NH, NJ, NY, PA, RI, SC, VA, VT
CardMatch™ from creditcards.com
See issuer's website
300
Use the CardMatch tool to find cards you're likely to qualify for with your credit score, without a hard pull on your credit.
loading

Compare up to 4 providers

Is it better to close a credit card with zero balance?

You can expect a similar impact on your credit score when you close your credit card with or without a balance.

Consider closing the card early if you’re worried that you might keep using the credit card when you’re trying to pay off the balance. On the other hand, closing the card after you’re down to zero balance ensures you never have to think about that card account again.

Bottom line

You’re free to close your credit card, even when it has an outstanding balance. But make sure you have a plan to repay that balance. Consider looking at balance transfer credit cards to pay off that balance interest-free while you close your old card account.

Frequently asked questions

More guides on Finder

Ask an Expert

You are about to post a question on finder.com:

  • Do not enter personal information (eg. surname, phone number, bank details) as your question will be made public
  • finder.com is a financial comparison and information service, not a bank or product provider
  • We cannot provide you with personal advice or recommendations
  • Your answer might already be waiting – check previous questions below to see if yours has already been asked

Finder.com provides guides and information on a range of products and services. Because our content is not financial advice, we suggest talking with a professional before you make any decision.

By submitting your comment or question, you agree to our Privacy and Cookies Policy and finder.com Terms of Use.

Questions and responses on finder.com are not provided, paid for or otherwise endorsed by any bank or brand. These banks and brands are not responsible for ensuring that comments are answered or accurate.
Go to site