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Where to buy a pulse oximeter online

Find in-stock options from these retailers.

Pulse oximeters are small, noninvasive devices that use light to measure blood oxygen saturation — or, how well oxygen is circulating through the blood to body parts furthest from your heart. Think arms, legs, hands and feet.

Purchase these handy tools to keep at home and use whenever you need. And we have a list of online retailers that can deliver one straight to your door.

Amazon

Amazon

Don’t miss a beat with numerous oximeter options.

As expected, Amazon offers a huge selection of major brands on electronic items. Prime members enjoy free two-day shipping on most orders.

  • Free shipping over $25
  • Free returns
  • No financing options
Newegg

Newegg

Newegg’s heart is in the right place with so many oximeter choices.

Pulse oximeters abound at Newegg. Free shipping is available for most items.

  • No free shipping
  • No free returns
  • No financing options
Walmart

Walmart

Find a hearty supply of pulse oximeters right here to keep on track.

If you’ve had your finger on the pulse for too long, take a rest. Walmart gives you hundreds of oximeter options so can more easily track your health. Choose its curbside pickup option, or get goods delivered to your door for free.

  • Free shipping over $35
  • Free returns
  • No financing options

A pulse oximeter measures the amount of oxygen reaching the areas of your body furthest away from your heart. Complications from COVID-19 frequently arise when your lungs can't pump enough oxygen to the rest of your body. An oximeter helps to show when your oxygen levels may be dropping.

While only a medical professional should assess your physical condition, the readings on an oximeter can be excellent data to provide your doctor or other healthcare professional to help evaluate whether you require medical attention.

How do I read a pulse oximeter?

Typical pulse oximeters monitor two things: your pulse and your SpO%. The SpO% reading is your oxygen saturation, or the amount of oxygen carried in your bloodstream.

Most oximeters should indicate your pulse with the letters BPM, or beats per minute. A typical resting heart rate for most adults is between 60 and 100 beats per minute. The oximeter should also indicate your oxygen saturation with the letters SpO%. Your specific oximeter model may vary.

Some pulse oximeter readings require a caregiver or health professional to read them rather than the patient. The numbers may appear upside-down if you're using the oximeter on yourself. It can be easy to read the numbers backwards or mix up your pulse reading with your oxygen saturation reading.

Refer to your oximeter's instruction packet for proper use and how to read your specific model. Or, refer to the FDA's guidelines on pulse oximeters, their accuracy and limitations.

What’s a normal reading on a pulse oximeter?

Values in the normal range are typically between 95% and 100%. According to the Mayo Clinic, readings below 90% are considered low. If you’re concerned about a low blood oxygen reading, seek immediate medical attention.

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