Business loan underwriting explained | finder.com

Business loan underwriting — understand how your application is evaluated

Exactly how do lenders decide you’re worthy? Here’s how to tip the process in your favor.

You know that loans come with eligibility requirements. But how do lenders actually decide whether you’re a worthy borrower? In short, lenders assess your application through a process called underwriting.

An underwriter’s job is to make sure that you aren’t too much of a risk for the lender to take on. They want to be absolutely sure that they can get their money back if all goes wrong and you default. Here’s what you should know to tip underwriting in your favor.

OnDeck Small Business Loans

OnDeck Small Business Loans

Among the largest online business lenders offering term loans and lines of credit at competitive fixed rates.

  • Minimum Amount: $5,000
  • Maximum Amount: $500,000
  • Loan Term: 3 to 36 months
  • Simple online application process with fast decisions
  • Dedicated loan specialists and loyalty benefits
  • Must have been in business for at least one year with annual revenue of $100,000+
  • Must have a personal credit score of 500+

    How does loan underwriting work?

    After you’ve submitted your loan application, documents, sweat and tears — then what? You don’t have much else to do but wait, but the lender’s job is just beginning.

    First, everything goes to an underwriter. An underwriter determines the risk of offering you a loan and then compares this risk against a lender’s parameters to decide whether it’s acceptable.

    There was a time when lenders evaluated applications manually, but many lenders today automate the process with underwriting software and proprietary algorithms. Automated underwriting means that lenders can approve your application in a matter of minutes — rather than in weeks or months.

    What factors do small business loan underwriters consider?

    Underwriters take into account a lot of different criteria, depending on who you’re borrowing from and the type of loan you’re looking for.

    • Your business’s monthly revenue. Lenders don’t want to lend you money if you’re unable to prove that your business brings in enough money to pay it back. Many require businesses to make at least $10,000 a month.
    • Your personal credit score. To a lender, having good credit proves you have experience managing debt. Some online lenders don’t pay as much attention to credit scores as banks will, but solid creditworthiness never hurts.
    • The value of your collateral. If you’re taking out a secured business loan, lenders want to make sure that your collateral is at least worth the amount you’re asking to borrow.
    • Other sources of repayment. Underwriters will consider other ways you could repay your loans like personal or government guarantors and insurance.
    • Personal equity. Did you help finance your small business when it was just starting up? Maybe you invested your own personal assets. Lenders like to see that you have something at stake when you’re applying for a loan.

    Top online business loans you can apply for today

    Rates last updated February 21st, 2018
    Name Product Product Description Min Loan Amount Maximum Loan Amount Requirements
    LendingTree Business Loans
    Compare multiple business financing options in one place including: small business loans, lines of credit, SBA loans, equipment financing and more.
    Varies by lender and type of financing
    Varies by lender and type of financing
    Varies by lender, but you many require good personal credit, a minimum business age and minimum annual revenue.
    OnDeck Small Business Loans
    A leading online business lender offering flexible financing at competitive fixed rates.
    $5,000
    $500,000
    Must have been in business for at least one year with annual revenue of $100K+. Must have a personal credit score of 500+.
    LendingClub Business Loans
    With loan terms that vary from 1 to 5 years, enjoy fixed monthly payments and no prepayment penalties through this award-winning lender.
    $5,000
    $300,000
    2+ years in business; $75,000+ in yearly sales; No bankruptcies or tax liens; At least 20% ownership of your business; Fair or better personal credit
    LoanBuilder, A PayPal Service Business Loans
    $5,000
    $500,000
    Annual business revenue of at least $100,000, at least 1 year in business, personal credit score of 600+.
    National Business Capital Business Loans
    Get a large business loan to cover your financing needs, no matter what the purpose is.
    $10,000
    $5,000,000
    Your company must have been in business for at least 6 months and have an annual revenue of at least $180,000.
    Kabbage Small Business Line of Credit
    A simple, convenient online application could securely get the funds you need to grow your business.
    $2,000
    $250,000
    Must have been in business for at least 1 year. Revenue minimum is $50,000 annually or $4,200 per month over the last 3 months.
    SmartBiz SBA Loans
    Get funding for your small business with a government-backed loan and extended repayment terms.
    $30,000
    $5,000,000
    Personal credit score of 650+; US citizen or permanent resident; Business must be 2+ years old; Annual revenue of $50,000+; No outstanding tax liens; No bankruptcies or foreclosures in past 3 years.
    Excel Capital Management Small Business Loans
    Get personalized financing options that suit your unique business needs in just a few simple steps.
    Varies by loan type
    Varies by loan type
    Your business must operate in the US, be at least 1 year old and have monthly revenue of $15,000+.

    Compare up to 4 providers

    How do I explain financial gaps to a lender?

    Automated and electronic approvals typically require your information to fit in specific fields and boxes, squeezing out the ability to explain financial gaps or clarify information.

    If you’re worried about presenting a clear, complete picture of your past, consider going with a lender that uses manual underwriting. Keep in mind that a manual process can require more time than one that’s automated — and that your explanation might still not be enough.

    Leverage your loan application with a business plan

    Revenue, tax forms and other documentation might not tell your business’s whole story. If that’s the case, a business plan can make all the difference. This document is where you get to make a case for yourself when you’re borrowing from a lender that uses manual underwriting.
    How to write a great business plan

    Understanding underwriting ratios

    Underwriting ratios are frequently the most important criteria lenders use when deciding whether to lend you money. The idea is to tell your lender that you have enough assets to pay back your loan if you default.

    Four financial ratios to know:

    1. Debt service coverage ratio. This ratio compares your business’s income and assets with the total amount of funding it’s already borrowed. You might have trouble with approval if your DSCR is below 1.25.
    2. Debt-to-asset ratio. Underwriters often consider this if you’re applying for a loan without collateral. They want to make sure you have enough in assets — usually equipment or property — to cover the cost of the loan in the event that you default. Lenders typically look for a ratio of more than 1.0.
    3. Loan-to-value ratio. In this case, value refers to your collateral. Make sure that it’s worth at least the amount you’re taking out. It should be at 0.8 or lower — meaning that your collateral is worth at least 20% more than the amount you want to borrow.
    4. Ratio of net worth to loan size. Comparing your company’s or personal net worth — meaning financial assets and debt — to the loan amount is another way that underwriters make sure you can afford the loan. Something close to 1.0 is ideal, but some lenders might be more forgiving.

    Bottom line

    It’s important to consider your lender’s underwriting process when looking for a business loan. Loan underwriting differs by lender, but you’ll more often end up with a lender that uses automated underwriting software — especially if they promise a quick response.

    If your application needs some ‘splaining, you might want to specifically look for a lender that uses manual underwriting to get the benefit of a human reviewing your initial application.

    Frequently asked questions

    Anna Serio

    Anna Serio is a writer at finder who specializes in loans. She spent the past five years living in Beirut, where she worked as a news editor and hung out with a lot of cats. She loves to eat, travel and save money.

    Was this content helpful to you? No  Yes

    Ask an Expert

    You are about to post a question on finder.com:

    • Do not enter personal information (eg. surname, phone number, bank details) as your question will be made public
    • finder.com is a financial comparison and information service, not a bank or product provider
    • We cannot provide you with personal advice or recommendations
    • Your answer might already be waiting – check previous questions below to see if yours has already been asked

    Finder only provides general advice and factual information, so consider your own circumstances, read the PDS or seek advice before you decide to act on our content. By submitting a question, you're accepting our Terms and Conditions and our Privacy Policy.
    Go to site