Bitcoin weekly price analysis 28 August: Token's value soars in face of ETF rejections | finder.com

Bitcoin weekly price analysis 28 August: Token’s value soars in face of ETF rejections

Peter Terlato 28 August 2018 NEWS

The world’s most popular coin has seen some impressive gains, despite the SEC’s ETF refusals.

Key takeaways

  • Bitcoin endured lashes early in the week to finish way ahead, bucking bearish sentiment.
  • Trading volumes have risen substantially week-on-week.
  • The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) rejected a total of nine different bitcoin ETF proposals.

bitcoin

Bitcoin’s price at the beginning of the week, Tuesday 21 August, was $6,434.24. The cryptocurrency’s value shot up dramatically that evening to $6,789.60.

Those gains were quickly reversed by Wednesday 22 August, touching a weekly low of $6,324.70. However, since that point the token’s value has witnessed steady and healthy gains, climbing higher and higher each day.

Bitcoin saw a 4% daily hike in price on Friday 24 August and a weekly high of $7,083.29 on Tuesday 28 August.

At the time of writing, the world’s most popular digital currency held a value of $7,054.31.

24-hour trading volumes increased week-on-week, starting at $3.37 billion and finishing at $4.52 billion.

Bitcoin short positions have been significantly rising since the last major bull run at the end of 2017.

The latest Commitments of Traders (COT) report, released by the US Commodities and Futures Trading Commission (CFTC), suggests that the number of bitcoin bear traders in the futures market may be starting to die down.

The report found that the net position on bitcoin futures slipped down by 1,266 for the week ending 21 August. Short positions dropped to 3,426, down 210 contracts week-on-week, while long positions rose by 56 to 2,160.

After rising above the resistance zone of $6,700-$6,850, the bulls pushed on, passing the peak ($6,899) of the prior rally on 22 August. CoinDesk reports that the next level of resistance is currently set at $7,165.

The United States Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) rejected nine different applications for bitcoin exchange-traded funds (ETFs) this week, maintaining the same rhetoric and rationale from previous refusals. The ETF proposals were submitted by three separate firms: Direxion (5), GraniteShares (2) and ProShares (2).

You can learn all about different exchanges, understand exactly how to buy and sell cryptocurrencies, calculate your taxes, discover digital wallets to hold assets and explore a list of all the alternative coins on the market.

Disclaimer: This information should not be interpreted as an endorsement of cryptocurrency or any specific provider, service or offering. It is not a recommendation to trade. Cryptocurrencies are speculative, complex and involve significant risks – they are highly volatile and sensitive to secondary activity. Performance is unpredictable and past performance is no guarantee of future performance. Consider your own circumstances, and obtain your own advice, before relying on this information. You should also verify the nature of any product or service (including its legal status and relevant regulatory requirements) and consult the relevant Regulators' websites before making any decision. Finder, or the author, may have holdings in the cryptocurrencies discussed.

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