What is the average credit score in America?

See how your credit score compares to others in the US.

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America is currently participating in what is tantamount to a nationwide credit repair, with the average credit score in the United States hitting 703 in 2019, according to Consumer Credit Review by Experian. This is up 2.03% from 2010 when the average credit score in the US was just 689.

YearNational average credit score
2010689
2011689
2012693
2013691
2014693
2015695
2016699
2017699
2018701
2019703

How is America’s credit?

The average credit score of 66% of the American population actually falls within the “good” credit category, according to Experian.

The average credit score has risen steadily for the better part of a decade and, along with the growing number of Americans with good credit, the number of Americans with very poor credit is on the way down.

In 2010, roughly one-fifth (21%) of Americans had a credit score of 300 to 579, or very poor. As of 2019, that number has dropped to just 16%.

Credit scoreCredit range20102019
Very poor300-57921%16%
Fair580-66918%18%
Good670-73919%21%
Very good740-79924%25%
Excellent800-85018%20%

Which state has the highest average credit score?

Perhaps we should all follow Minnesota’s North Star — the state has the best credit in the country with an average credit score of 733, a number that’s just shy of jumping from good to very good. Both the Dakotas share second place with an average credit score of 727.

From the looks of the top 10, those from the Midwest are pretty good with their money. Half of the top states with the best average credit are located in America’s heartland: Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wisconsin and Nebraska.

As for the state with the worst credit, Mississippi takes the crown with an average score of 667. This gives Mississippi the dubious honor of being the only state with an average score that’s not within the good range (670–739) but rather a rating of fair (580–669) — if only by a whisker.

Dominating the 10 states with the worst average credit score are 8 in the South: Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama, Texas, South Carolina, Georgia, Oklahoma, Arkansas.

State20182019Rank
Alabama680680Tied 48
Alaska70470728
Arizona69469636
Arkansas68368344
California70670827
Colorado716718Tied 13
Connecticut71671715
Delaware700701Tied 33
District of Columbia70070332
Florida694694Tied 37
Georgia680682Tied 45
Hawaii721723Tied 7
Idaho710711Tied 23
Illinois709709Tied 25
Indiana69869935
Iowa720720Tied 11
Kansas711711Tied 23
Kentucky69169239
Louisiana67567750
Maine71271517
Maryland70170431
Massachusetts721723Tied 7
Michigan70570629
Minnesota7327331
Mississippi66666751
Missouri700701Tied 33
Montana718720Tied 11
Nebraska722723Tied 7
Nevada684686Tied 42
New Hampshire7227246
New Jersey71371418
New Mexico685686Tied 42
New York710712Tied 21
North Carolina693694Tied 37
North Dakota726727Tied 2
Ohio70470530
Oklahoma682682Tied 45
Oregon716718Tied 13
Pennsylvania711713Tied 19
Rhode Island710713Tied 19
South Carolina68068147
South Dakota727727Tied 2
Tennessee68969040
Texas680680Tied 48
Utah71471616
Vermont7257264
Virginia708709Tied 25
Washington721723Tied 7
West Virginia68668741
Wisconsin7187255
Wyoming711712Tied 21

Does higher education mean higher credit scores?

Education matters, at least in regard to your credit score. We found a moderately positive correlation between a state’s average credit score and the percentage of the adult population in each state with a bachelors or higher. In short, the higher the proportion of a state’s population with a bachelor’s degree or higher, the higher the credit score.

A notable exception is Washington, DC: While not a state, the nation’s capital is home to a far higher percentage of people with a bachelor’s degree when compared to the rest of the US, and yet its average credit score is 703 — in line with the nation’s average.

State% with bachelor’s degree or higher educationEducation rank
Alabama22.75%45
Alaska26.20%33
Arizona26.17%34
Arkansas20.76%49
California30.31%15
Colorado36.72%3
Connecticut36.05%6
Delaware28.87%21
District of Columbia52.88%1
Florida27.01%28
Georgia27.85%26
Hawaii29.75%18
Idaho24.31%42
Illinois31.54%13
Indiana23.81%43
Iowa25.92%36
Kansas29.86%20
Kentucky21.75%47
Louisiana21.70%48
Maine28.87%20
Maryland36.59%4
Massachusetts39.71%2
Michigan26.27%32
Minnesota32.85%11
Mississippi19.76%50
Missouri26.34%31
Montana28.40%24
Nebraska28.75%22
Nevada22.19%46
New Hampshire33.73%9
New Jersey36.31%5
New Mexico24.40%41
New York33.54%10
North Carolina27.93%25
North Dakota26.94%29
Ohio25.66%37
Oklahoma22.87%44
Oregon30.24%16
Pennsylvania28.63%23
Rhode Island30.48%14
South Carolina25.14%38
South Dakota26.10%35
Tennessee24.6035
Texas26.50%30
Utah28.99%19
Vermont34.06%8
Virginia35.00%7
Washington32.47%12
West Virginia18.89%51
Wisconsin27.25%27
Wyoming24.40%40

Be Vigilant of your Credit

On the whole, the US is doing well for itself when it comes to credit. The rising average over the last decade points to not just a growing economy, but a willingness to take on credit and use it responsibly. A majority of the US populace falls into the “Good” credit category, and with that comes access to a variety of credit card resources. Maintaining good credit is the goal. A few simple things to keep in mind are be aware and be proactive. Remember when you apply for a loan or credit card, it gets on your credit report as a hard inquiry and brings down your score. Prove that you are a responsible borrower and keep your credit accounts and good standing by being on time and being vigilant.

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